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dc.contributor.authorWorthington, Andrew C.
dc.contributor.editorNguyen, Tom
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-16T07:58:18Z
dc.date.available2020-01-16T07:58:18Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.otherRePEc:gri:epaper:economics:201108
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/390427
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, we investigate productivity growth in 55 major Australian urban water utilities using nonparametric frontier techniques over the period 2005/06 to 2008/09. The five outputs included in the analysis are chemical and microbiological compliance, and the inverses of real losses per connection, the number of water main breaks per 100 km of water main, and water quality and service complaints per 1,000 properties. The input is operating expenditure. Using Malmquist indices, we decompose productivity growth into technical efficiency and technological change. The results indicate that annual productivity growth averaged 1.04 percent across all utilities and was largely attributable to efficiency gain, roughly equally split between pure technical efficiency and gains from scale. As in many other highly regulated Australian industries, technological improvements during this period are very small, averaging just 0.22 percent a year. We subsequently employ second-stage regression analysis to quantify the effects of uncontrollable (nondiscretionary) factors on total factor productivity and efficiency change, including the role of different water sources (surface, ground, recycled and bulk water purchases) and utility size. The results indicate that imposed environmental factors only account for a small percentage of the observed variation in efficiency, technology change, and productivity improvements.en_US
dc.format.extent28 pages
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherGriffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane, Australiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto28en_US
dc.subject.keywordsD24 - Production; Cost; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
dc.subject.keywordsC61 - Optimization Techniques; Programming Models; Dynamic Analysis
dc.subject.keywordsL95 - Gas Utilities; Pipelines; Water Utilities
dc.subject.keywordsProductivityen_US
dc.subject.keywordstechnical and scale efficiencyen_US
dc.subject.keywordstechnological progressen_US
dc.subject.keywordsMalmquist indicesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsurban water utiltiesen_US
dc.title2011-08: Efficiency, technology, and productivity change in Australian urban water utilities (Working paper)en_US
dc.typeReporten_US
dc.type.descriptionDiscussion Paperen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School
gro.description.notepublicEconomics and Business Statistics
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright © 2010 by author(s). No part of this paper may be reproduced in any form, or stored in a retrieval system, without prior permission of the author(s).
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorWorthington, Andrew C.


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