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dc.contributor.authorRohde, Nicholas
dc.contributor.authorTang, Kam K.
dc.contributor.authorOsberg, Lars
dc.contributor.authorRao, Prasada
dc.contributor.editorRohde, Nicholas
dc.contributor.editorNaranpanawa, Athula
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-16T07:57:02Z
dc.date.available2020-01-16T07:57:02Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn1837-7750en_US
dc.identifier.otherRePEc:gri:epaper:economics:201406
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/390436
dc.description.abstractThis paper estimates the impact of economic insecurity on the mental health of Australian adults. Taking microdata from the 2001-2011 HILDA panel survey, we produce a conceptually diverse set of insecurity measures and explore their relationships with the SF-36 mental health index. By using fixed effects models that control for unobservable heterogeneity, and by exploiting exogenous fluctuations in economic conditions as an identification strategy, we produce estimates that correct for endogeneity more thoroughly than previous works. Our results show that exposure to economic risks has consistently detrimental health effects. The main novelty comes from the breadth of risks that are found to be harmful. Job insecurity, financial dissatisfaction, reductions in income, an inability to meet standard expenditures and a lack of access to emergency funds all adversely affect health. This suggests that the common element of economic insecurity (rather than idiosyncratic phenomena associated with any specific risk) is likely to be hazardous. Our preferred estimates indicate that a standard deviation shock to economic insecurity lowers an individual's mental health score by between 1.4 and 2 percentage points. If applied uniformly across the Australian population, such a shock would increase the morbidity rate of mental disorders by 2.5-3.8%.en_US
dc.format.extent28 pages
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherGriffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane, Australiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto28en_US
dc.subject.keywordsD63 - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
dc.subject.keywordsEconomic Insecurityen_US
dc.subject.keywordsInstrumental Variablesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsMental Healthen_US
dc.subject.keywordsPanel Data.en_US
dc.title2014-06: The Effect of Economic Insecurity on Mental Health: Recent Evidence from Australian Panel Data (Working paper)en_US
dc.typeReporten_US
dc.type.descriptionDiscussion Paperen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School
gro.description.notepublicEconomics and Business Statistics
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright © 2010 by author(s). No part of this paper may be reproduced in any form, or stored in a retrieval system, without prior permission of the author(s).
gro.date.issued2014
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorRohde, Nicholas


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