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dc.contributor.authorMilner, Allisonen_US
dc.contributor.authorDe Leo, Diegoen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcClure, R.en_US
dc.contributor.editorInternational Association for Suicide Preventionen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T11:24:04Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T11:24:04Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2012-02-10T01:17:00Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/39043
dc.description.abstractGlobalisation is an expansive process, capable of changing social, economic, political, and cultural structures. The large-scale transformations involved globalisation have been noted as influencing a wide range of human illnesses and causes of death. The aims of this study were to examine whether globalisation has an influence on male and female suicide rates, as measured across time and between countries. A globalisation 'index' was developed to measure the level of globalisation in 35 countries from the year 1980 onwards. Time-series cross-country data (from 1980 onwards) was used to estimate the relationship between globalisation, ecological risk and protective factors, and age-standardised suicide rates in 35 countries. Data was obtained from the WHO Statistical Information System, the United Nations Data Service (UN Data), the World Development, Indicators (WDI), the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization Institute for Statistics (UNESCO), and the International Labour Organization (ILO). Results of a fixed-effect regression analysis found that globalisation was directly related to male suicide rates, but had no significant effect on female suicide rates. The widespread changes associated with globalisation may have unsettled societies around the world by altering economic, social, and cultural regulatory mechanisms. The loss of these protective influences may increase the risk of suicide by creating a sense of insecurity, uncertainty, and 'anomie'. It appears that men are more affected by the societal changes associated with the globalisation process than women. These findings suggest that global social processes need to be included in population-level strategies for suicide prevention.en_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent21487 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherInternational Association for Suicide Preventionen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.iasp.info/congresses.phpen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencename4th Asia Pacific Regional Conference of the International Association for Suicide Preventionen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitle4th Asia Pacific Regional Conference of the International Association for Suicide Preventionen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2010-12-17en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2011-01-20en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationBrisbaneen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMental Healthen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111714en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111799en_US
dc.titleHas Globalisation Changed National Suicide Rates?en_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE3 - Conference Publications (Extract Paper)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, Australian Institute for Suicide Research & Preventionen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2010. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this conference please refer to the conference’s website or contact the authors.en_US
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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