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dc.contributor.authorMuskett, A
dc.contributor.authorRadtke, S
dc.contributor.authorWhite, S
dc.contributor.authorOllendick, T
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-22T02:57:04Z
dc.date.available2020-01-22T02:57:04Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn2195-7177
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s40489-019-00159-w
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/390717
dc.description.abstractAutism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder affecting approximately 1 in 59 children (Baio et al. MMWR Surveillance Summaries, 67(6), 1, 2018). A commonly experienced psychiatric comorbidity in ASD is anxiety. Although this is known, little research has been done on the specific issues concerning specific phobia in ASD, even though specific phobias (SPs) are present in up to 40% of children with ASD. As one of the leading treatments for anxiety, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been adapted for many different populations, including children with ASD. However, the work that has been done on treatment of SP in ASD has been mostly case studies from an operant perspective. These case studies have not, to our knowledge, utilized CBT; however, they suggest that behaviorally based treatments may be effective. Still, they do not explore potential mechanisms associated with the co-occurrence of these disorders, such as sensory sensitivity, that may be responsible for these differences. Within the context of ASD, Green and Ben-Sasson (Journal of autism and developmental disorders, 40(12), 1495-1504, 2010) suggest a model of SP based on classical fear conditioning theory, which suggests sensory sensitivities cause anxieties by conditioning children to associate aversive sensations with certain objects that consequently come to elicit fear and anxiety. Here, we suggest three potential modifications of CBT to address sensory sensitivity in youth with ASD. In offering these modifications, we attempt to address explicitly the potential mechanisms underlying the development of SP in youth with ASD.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.publisher.placeGermany
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom289
dc.relation.ispartofpageto293
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalReview Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
dc.relation.ispartofvolume6
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNeurosciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSpecialist Studies in Education
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1109
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1303
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciences
dc.subject.keywordsPsychology, Developmental
dc.subject.keywordsSensory sensitivty
dc.subject.keywordsSpecific phobia
dc.titleAutism Spectrum Disorder and Specific Phobia: the Role of Sensory Sensitivity: Brief Review
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationMuskett, A; Radtke, S; White, S; Ollendick, T, Autism Spectrum Disorder and Specific Phobia: the Role of Sensory Sensitivity: Brief Review, Review Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 2019, 6 (3), pp. 289-293
dc.date.updated2020-01-21T23:43:43Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorOllendick, Tom


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