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dc.contributor.authorEidenfalk, J
dc.contributor.authorWoodcock, S
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-22T23:35:16Z
dc.date.available2020-01-22T23:35:16Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn2195-3325
dc.identifier.doi10.5964/jspp.v7i1.993
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/390763
dc.description.abstractPolitical leadership has become increasingly volatile in recent times, as experienced directly by many of the leaders of both major parties in Australia over the last few decades who have been ousted by their own party. While some of these leaders have returned to power, others have faded away into history. Political capital can play a key role in the demise or reclaim of leadership and an immediate response can become critical not only in preventing any further loss of political capital but to begin the re-building of political capital towards a return to a leadership position. This study examined ousted political leaders and the likelihood of a return to leadership. Attribution theory was applied to the first press conference given by six Australian major party leaders immediately after having lost their leadership and were analysed thematically to show what the attributional causes of their successes and failures were during their tenure as party leader. The results indicate that what one says and how one says it can be important for their prospects of returning to the seat of power. The major party leaders who returned to power tended to acknowledge successes due to the collective group, while the other major party leaders tended to attribute the successes to themselves and failures on external factors, including their own collective group. The results illustrate the importance of how one handles one’s downfall in order to climb back up.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.publisherLeibniz-Institute for Psychology Information (ZPID)
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom402
dc.relation.ispartofpageto422
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Social and Political Psychology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume7
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolitical Science
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSociology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1606
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1608
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.title“I’LL BE BACK…”: The Chance of a Political Comeback as Party Leader
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationEidenfalk, J; Woodcock, S, “I’LL BE BACK…”: The Chance of a Political Comeback as Party Leader, Journal of Social and Political Psychology, 2019, 7 (1), pp. 402-422
dcterms.licensehttp://www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.date.updated2020-01-22T23:29:22Z
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2019. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0) License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorWoodcock, Stuart


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