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dc.contributor.authorCurtis, Amyen_US
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Kristinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorR. Tyler, Tomen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-04T22:30:55Z
dc.date.available2017-04-04T22:30:55Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2011-06-08T06:43:57Z
dc.identifier.issn17485991en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1748-5991.2009.01043.xen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/39091
dc.description.abstractProcedural justice generally enhances an authority's legitimacy and encourages people to comply with an authority's decisions and rules. We argue, however, that previous research on procedural justice and legitimacy has examined legitimacy in a limited way by focusing solely on the perceived legitimacy of authorities and ignoring how people may perceive the legitimacy of the laws and rules they enforce. In addition, no research to date has examined how such perceptions of legitimacy may moderate the effect of procedural justice on compliance behavior. Using survey data collected across three different regulatory contexts - taxation (Study 1), social security (Study 2), and law enforcement (Study 3) - the findings suggest that one's perceptions of the legitimacy of the law moderates the effect of procedural justice on compliance behaviors; procedural justice is more important for shaping compliance behaviors when people question the legitimacy of the laws than when they accept them as legitimate. An explanation of these findings using a social distancing framework is offered, along with a discussion of the implications the findings have on enforcement.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Asiaen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto26en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofjournalRegulation & Governanceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume3en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLaw and Societyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160299en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode180119en_US
dc.titleNurturing regulatory compliance: Isprocedural justice effective when peoplequestion the legitimacy of the law?en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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