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dc.contributor.authorSell, Aaronen_US
dc.contributor.authorTooby, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorCosmides, Ledaen_US
dc.contributor.editorGordon H. Oriansen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:53:19Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:53:19Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2011-06-08T06:44:07Z
dc.identifier.issn00278424en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.0904312106en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/39095
dc.description.abstractEleven predictions derived from the recalibrational theory of anger were tested. This theory proposes that anger is produced by a neurocognitive program engineered by natural selection to use bargaining tactics to resolve conflicts of interest in favor of the angry individual. The program is designed to orchestrate two interpersonal negotiating tactics (conditionally inflicting costs or conditionally withholding benefits) to incentivize the target of the anger to place greater weight on the welfare of the angry individual. Individuals with enhanced abilities to inflict costs (e.g., stronger individuals) or to confer benefits (e.g., attractive individuals) have a better bargaining position in conflicts; hence, it was predicted that such individuals will be more prone to anger, prevail more in conflicts of interest, and consider themselves entitled to better treatment. These predictions were confirmed. Consistent with an evolutionary analysis, the effect of strength on anger was greater for men and the effect of attractiveness on anger was greater for women. Also as predicted, stronger men had a greater history of fighting than weaker men, and more strongly endorsed the efficacy of force to resolve conflicts-both in interpersonal and international conflicts. The fact that stronger men favored greater use of military force in international conflicts provides evidence that the internal logic of the anger program reflects the ancestral payoffs characteristic of a small-scale social world rather than rational assessments of modern payoffs in large populations.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherNational Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom15073en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto15078en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue35en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciencesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume106en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode179999en_US
dc.titleFormidability and the logic of human angeren_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorSell, Aaron N.


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