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dc.contributor.authorLiu, Xin
dc.contributor.authorVitetta, Luis
dc.contributor.authorKostner, Karam
dc.contributor.authorCrompton, David
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Gail
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Wendy J
dc.contributor.authorLopez, Alan
dc.contributor.authorXue, Charlie C
dc.contributor.authorOei, Tian P
dc.contributor.authorByrne, Gerard
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Jennifer H
dc.contributor.authorWhiteford, Harvey
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-10T23:38:15Z
dc.date.available2020-02-10T23:38:15Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1741-427X
dc.identifier.doi10.1155/2015/879712
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/391293
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the effects of Tai Chi, a low-impact mind-body movement therapy, on severity of depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms in centrally obese people with elevated depression symptoms. In total, 213 participants were randomized to a 24-week Tai Chi intervention program or a wait-list control group. Assessments were conducted at baseline and 12 and 24 weeks. Outcomes were severity of depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms, leg strength, central obesity, and other measures of metabolic symptom. There were statistically significant between-group differences in favor of the Tai Chi group in depression (mean difference = -5.6 units, P < 0.001), anxiety (-2.3 units, P < 0.01), and stress (-3.6 units, P < 0.001) symptom scores and leg strength (1.1 units, P < 0.001) at 12 weeks. These changes were further improved or maintained in the Tai Chi group relative to the control group during the second 12 weeks of follow-up. Tai Chi appears to be beneficial for reducing severity of depression, anxiety, and stress and leg strength in centrally obese people with depression symptoms. More studies with longer follow-up are needed to confirm the findings. This trial is registered with ACTRN12613000010796.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherHindawi Publishing
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEvidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
dc.relation.ispartofvolume2015
dc.subject.fieldofresearchComplementary and Alternative Medicine
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1104
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsIntegrative & Complementary Medicine
dc.subject.keywordsPHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
dc.subject.keywordsOLDER-ADULTS
dc.titleThe Effects of Tai Chi in Centrally Obese Adults with Depression Symptoms
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationLiu, X; Vitetta, L; Kostner, K; Crompton, D; Williams, G; Brown, WJ; Lopez, A; Xue, CC; Oei, TP; Byrne, G; Martin, JH; Whiteford, H, The Effects of Tai Chi in Centrally Obese Adults with Depression Symptoms, Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2015, 2015
dcterms.dateAccepted2014-12-28
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.date.updated2020-02-10T23:35:09Z
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.rights.copyright© 2015 Xin Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorCrompton, David R.


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