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dc.contributor.authorHamilton, Gemma
dc.contributor.authorPowell, Martine B
dc.contributor.authorBrubacher, Sonja P
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-13T03:55:00Z
dc.date.available2020-02-13T03:55:00Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn0005-0067
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ap.12196
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/391390
dc.description.abstractObjective: Despite the heterogeneity of Australian Aboriginal peoples, certain styles of relating are shared and are markedly different to the communication styles of non-Aboriginal peoples. These differences may affect the suitability of current investigative interview protocols to Australian Aboriginal children. This study aimed to qualitatively evaluate the applicability of an investigative interview protocol to Australian Aboriginal children and examine how it could be modified to better suit the communication styles in many Aboriginal communities. Method: A diverse group of 28 participants who had expertise in Aboriginal language and culture, as well as an understanding of the child investigative interview process, each partook in an in-depth semi-structured interview where they were prompted to reflect on Aboriginal language and culture with reference to a current interview protocol (in the context of sexual assault investigation). Results: Thematic analysis revealed overall support for the narrative-based structure of the interview protocol when eliciting information from Aboriginal children. A number of concerns were also identified, and these largely related to the syntax and vocabulary within the protocol, as well as the methods of questioning and building rapport with the child. Conclusions: Directions for future research and potential modifications to investigative interview protocols to better suit Aboriginal children are discussed.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom174
dc.relation.ispartofpageto183
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Psychologist
dc.relation.ispartofvolume52
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1702
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciences
dc.subject.keywordsPsychology, Multidisciplinary
dc.subject.keywordsAboriginal
dc.subject.keywordschild
dc.titleProfessionals' Perceptions Regarding the Suitability of Investigative Interview Protocols with Aboriginal Children
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationHamilton, G; Powell, MB; Brubacher, SP, Professionals' Perceptions Regarding the Suitability of Investigative Interview Protocols with Aboriginal Children, Australian Psychologist, 2017, 52 (3), pp. 174-183
dc.date.updated2020-02-13T01:01:14Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorBrubacher, Sonja
gro.griffith.authorPowell, Martine B.


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