Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMcInnes, Rhona J
dc.contributor.authorGillespie, Nicola
dc.contributor.authorCrossland, Nicola
dc.contributor.authorMoran, Victoria Hall
dc.contributor.authorHoddinott, Pat
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-14T04:06:32Z
dc.date.available2020-02-14T04:06:32Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1740-8695
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/mcn.12745
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/391502
dc.description.abstractImproving breastfeeding outcomes is a global priority; however, in the United Kingdom, continuation of breastfeeding remains low. Growing empirical evidence suggests a free breast pump service might be an acceptable and feasible incentive intervention to improve breastfeeding outcomes and reduce heath inequalities. To inform intervention development, we conducted an online survey with women recruited via social media using snowball sampling. Data were analysed descriptively (closed questions) with qualitative thematic analysis (free text). The survey was completed by 666 women, most of whom had recently breastfed and used a breast pump. Participants agreed that free pump hire (rental/loan; 567 women; 85.1%) or a free pump to keep (408; 61.3%) should be provided. Free text comments provided by 408 women (free pump) and 309 women (free hire) highlighted potential benefits: helping women to continue breastfeeding; express milk; overcome difficulties; and pump choice. Concerns are possible effect on breast milk supply, reduced breastfeeding, pumps replacing good support for breastfeeding, and pump hire hygiene. Personal and societal costs are important issues. Some suggested a pump service should be for low‐income mothers, those with feeding difficulties or sick/preterm infants. A one‐size service would not suit all and vouchers were proposed. Some suggested fees and deposits to prevent waste. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting views about the acceptability of providing a free breast pump hire service. Mothers support and wish to have a say in breast pump service development. Future evaluations should address impact on feeding outcomes, professional support, hygiene for hired pumps, and costs.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley Blackwell
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrome12745:1
dc.relation.ispartofpagetoe12745:11
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalMaternal & Child Nutrition
dc.relation.ispartofvolume15
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNutrition and Dietetics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1111
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsPediatrics
dc.subject.keywordsbreast milk
dc.titleWomen's views about a free breast pump service: Online survey informing intervention development
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationMcInnes, RJ; Gillespie, N; Crossland, N; Moran, VH; Hoddinott, P, Women's views about a free breast pump service: Online survey informing intervention development, Maternal & Child Nutrition, 2019, 15 (2), pp. e12745:1-e12745:11
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-10-16
dc.date.updated2020-02-14T04:02:25Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Women's views about a free breast pump service: Online survey informing intervention development, Maternal & Child Nutrition, Volume 15, Issue 2, e12745, 2019, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/mcn.12745. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html)
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorMcInnes, Rhona J.


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record