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dc.contributor.authorWillems, Sara M
dc.contributor.authorWright, Daniel J
dc.contributor.authorDay, Felix R
dc.contributor.authorTrajanoska, Katerina
dc.contributor.authorJoshi, Peter K
dc.contributor.authorMorris, John A
dc.contributor.authorMatteini, Amy M
dc.contributor.authorGarton, Fleur C
dc.contributor.authorGrarup, Niels
dc.contributor.authorOskolkov, Nikolay
dc.contributor.authorThalamuthu, Anbupalam
dc.contributor.authorMangino, Massimo
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Jun
dc.contributor.authorDemirkan, Ayse
dc.contributor.authorDerave, Wim
dc.contributor.authoret al.
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-14T04:19:35Z
dc.date.available2020-02-14T04:19:35Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ncomms16015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/391503
dc.description.abstractHand grip strength is a widely used proxy of muscular fitness, a marker of frailty, and predictor of a range of morbidities and all-cause mortality. To investigate the genetic determinants of variation in grip strength, we perform a large-scale genetic discovery analysis in a combined sample of 195,180 individuals and identify 16 loci associated with grip strength (P<5 × 10−8) in combined analyses. A number of these loci contain genes implicated in structure and function of skeletal muscle fibres (ACTG1), neuronal maintenance and signal transduction (PEX14, TGFA, SYT1), or monogenic syndromes with involvement of psychomotor impairment (PEX14, LRPPRC and KANSL1). Mendelian randomization analyses are consistent with a causal effect of higher genetically predicted grip strength on lower fracture risk. In conclusion, our findings provide new biological insight into the mechanistic underpinnings of grip strength and the causal role of muscular strength in age-related morbidities and mortality.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalNature Communications
dc.relation.ispartofvolume8
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsMultidisciplinary Sciences
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology - Other Topics
dc.subject.keywordsGENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION
dc.subject.keywordsGROWTH-FACTOR-ALPHA
dc.titleLarge-scale GWAS identifies multiple loci for hand grip strength providing biological insights into muscular fitness
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationWillems, et al., Large-scale GWAS identifies multiple loci for hand grip strength providing biological insights into muscular fitness, Nature Communications, 2017, 8 (1)
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-05-22
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.date.updated2020-02-14T04:16:05Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2017. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorDerave, Wim


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