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dc.contributor.authorSamper Carro, Sofia C
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Felicity
dc.contributor.authorBulbeck, David
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Sue
dc.contributor.authorLouys, Julien
dc.contributor.authorSpooner, Nigel
dc.contributor.authorQuestiaux, Danielle
dc.contributor.authorArnold, Lee
dc.contributor.authorPrice, Gilbert J
dc.contributor.authorWood, Rachel
dc.contributor.authorMahirta
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-17T00:27:17Z
dc.date.available2020-02-17T00:27:17Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn0047-2484
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jhevol.2019.07.002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/391531
dc.description.abstractThe migration of anatomically modern humans (AMH) from Africa to every inhabitable continent included their dispersal through Island Southeast Asia (ISEA) to Australia. Significantly, this involved overwater dispersal through the Lesser Sunda Islands between Sunda (continental Southeast Asia) and Sahul (Australia and New Guinea). However, the timing and direction of this movement is still debated. Here, we report on human skeletal material recovered from excavations at two rockshelters, known locally as Tron Bon Lei, on Alor Island, Indonesia. The remains, dated to the Late Pleistocene, are the first anatomically modern human remains recovered in Wallacea dated to this period and are associated with cultural material demonstrating intentional burial. The human remains from Tron Bon Lei represent a population osteometrically distinct from Late Pleistocene Sunda and Sahul AMH. Instead, morphometrically, they appear more similar to Holocene populations in the Lesser Sundas. Thus, they may represent the remains of a population originally from Sunda whose Lesser Sunda Island descendants survived into the Holocene.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Human Evolution
dc.relation.ispartofvolume134
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEvolutionary Biology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAnthropology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchArchaeology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0603
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1601
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2101
dc.subject.keywordsAnatomically modern humans
dc.subject.keywordsCraniometrics
dc.subject.keywordsHuman migration
dc.subject.keywordsIndonesia
dc.subject.keywordsLate Pleistocene
dc.titleSomewhere beyond the sea: Human cranial remains from the Lesser Sunda Islands (Alor Island, Indonesia) provide insights on Late Pleistocene peopling of Island Southeast Asia
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationSamper Carro, SC; Gilbert, F; Bulbeck, D; O'Connor, S; Louys, J; Spooner, N; Questiaux, D; Arnold, L; Price, GJ; Wood, R; Mahirta, Somewhere beyond the sea: Human cranial remains from the Lesser Sunda Islands (Alor Island, Indonesia) provide insights on Late Pleistocene peopling of Island Southeast Asia, Journal of Human Evolution, 2019, 134
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-07-06
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.date.updated2020-02-17T00:24:13Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence, which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorLouys, Julien


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