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dc.contributor.authorMartus, Ellie
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-26T01:21:43Z
dc.date.available2020-02-26T01:21:43Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1469-3062
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/14693062.2018.1448254
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/391914
dc.description.abstractGlobally, the metals and mining sector is a major contributor to GHG emissions. Climate change also poses significant challenges for the industry in a number of ways, including risks to infrastructure and equipment, transport routes and the cost of energy supplies. The sector is of particular importance to Russia, and yet very little is known about how the sector positions itself in relation to this key issue. This article conducts an in-depth look at the response of the Russian metals and mining sector to climate change. It looks at the key actors, their willingness to engage with the issue of climate change, preferred policy options and the strategies adopted to further their interests. The role of companies, prominent individuals and business associations is considered. The evidence suggests that, although there is widespread acceptance of climate change as a phenomenon, there is significant variation within the sector, with some companies proactive on climate policy, and others more reluctant. Different responses are attributed to reputational factors and the disproportionate influence of international and domestic policy developments on companies. Russian coal companies, directly threatened by any international attempts to reduce coal consumption, display the strongest opposition to efforts aimed at curbing emissions. The Russian government, far from thinking of transitioning to a low carbon future, is vigorously trying to expand the coal industry. Key policy insights Understanding how Russia’s domestic position on climate policy is formed is fundamental for understanding the factors driving its international engagement on climate policy. The Russian government has no plans to phase out coal and is instead actively seeking to expand the coal industry. This highlights the obstacles to Russia’s commitment to climate policy at both the domestic and international levels. The socio-economic consequences of climate policy for the Russian coal industry are a key consideration for the government, with some regions heavily dependent on the industry for employment and electricity generation.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherRoutledge: Taylor & Francis Group
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom17
dc.relation.ispartofpageto29
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalClimate Policy
dc.relation.ispartofvolume19
dc.subject.fieldofresearchApplied Economics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolicy and Administration
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLaw
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1402
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1605
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1801
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciences
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsEnvironmental Studies
dc.subject.keywordsPublic Administration
dc.titleRussian industry responses to climate change: the case of the metals and mining sector
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationMartus, E, Russian industry responses to climate change: the case of the metals and mining sector, Climate Policy, 2019, 19 (1), pp. 17-29
dc.date.updated2020-02-26T01:18:24Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyrightThis is an Author's Accepted Manuscript of an article published in Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly, Volume 19, Issue 1, Pages 17-29, 22 Mar 2018, copyright Taylor & Francis, available online at: https://doi.org/10.1080/14693062.2018.1448254
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorMartus, Ellie M.


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