Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorJudge, Chantelle
dc.contributor.authorEley, Rob
dc.contributor.authorMiyakawa-Liu, Monica
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Nathan J
dc.contributor.authorMcCosker, Laura
dc.contributor.authorLivesay, Georgia
dc.contributor.authorHughes, James A
dc.contributor.authorVallmuur, Kirsten
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-26T05:19:49Z
dc.date.available2020-02-26T05:19:49Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1742-6731
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1742-6723.13201
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/391927
dc.description.abstractObjective: Injuries are a major burden on the Australian healthcare system. Power tool usage is a common cause of accidental injury. A better understanding of the trends of power tool injuries will inform prevention strategies and potentially mitigate costs. Methods: The ED databases from two level 1 hospitals were reviewed for presentations between 2005 and 2015 resulting from accidental injury with power tools. A subgroup of patients presenting to one hospital between 2016 and 2017 were interviewed about the activities and circumstances that led to their injuries, and followed up 3 months later to assess outcomes. Results: A total of 4057 cases of accidental injury from power tool use were identified. Power saws and grinders contributed to 54% of injuries. Most injuries were located on an upper limb (48%) or the head and neck (30%). Over half (54%) of all head injuries were associated with metal and wood fragments to the eye from grinders, drills and saws. Hospital admission rates were highest for patients aged >60 years. Injuries to females were <5% of all presentations, but 40% of those caused by lawnmowers. Among the 200 patients interviewed, lapses in concentration during use, and modification and inappropriate use of a power tool were the main contributors to injury. Recovery periods >3 months were common. Conclusions: Accidental injuries from power tool use have a considerable impact on ED resources and can affect the long-term quality of life of those injured. Effective education about safe usage and protection may prevent many injuries.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley Blackwell
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom436
dc.relation.ispartofpageto443
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEmergency Medicine Australasia
dc.relation.ispartofvolume31
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsEmergency Medicine
dc.subject.keywordsaccident prevention
dc.subject.keywordsaccidents home
dc.titleCharacteristics of accidental injuries from power tools treated at two emergency departments in Queensland
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationJudge, C; Eley, R; Miyakawa-Liu, M; Brown, NJ; McCosker, L; Livesay, G; Hughes, JA; Vallmuur, K, Characteristics of accidental injuries from power tools treated at two emergency departments in Queensland, Emergency Medicine Australasia, 2019, 31 (3), pp. 436-443
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-10-09
dc.date.updated2020-02-26T00:18:31Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorMcCosker, Laura K.


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record