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dc.contributor.authorOwnsworth, Tamara
dc.contributor.authorChambers, Suzanne Kathleen
dc.contributor.authorDhillon, Haryana Mary
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-28T01:02:36Z
dc.date.available2020-02-28T01:02:36Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn2234-943X
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fonc.2015.00243
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/392000
dc.description.abstractNeuro-oncology is a complex field encompassing scientific and clinical developments in the diagnosis and management of cancers directly affecting the central nervous system (CNS). These include brain tumors and metastases, and non-CNS cancers and treatments that produce neurocognitive impairment. To date, the dominant focus of neuro-oncology literature has been on the biological mechanisms and neurocognitive effects of brain tumor and cancer. However, neurocognitive impairments and psychological disorders arise from an interaction between physiological, medical, and psychosocial factors (1). Therefore, to guide holistic models of care, a biopsychosocial perspective is needed (2). Psychosocial aspects of care focus on how people perceive and react to their diagnosis and symptoms and the ways in which they cope with their illness within their social context. Subjective reports of symptoms are often more closely related to quality of life than objective indices, such as neuropsychological test performance (2). High rates of depression and anxiety have been consistently reported in neuro-oncology samples, with distress found to persist or even increase over time (3). Due to the increased emphasis on outpatient care, family members assume the primary role in supporting individuals to cope with symptoms and the everyday impact of their illness. Cancer can place strain on relationships and compromise the physical and mental health of family members, in turn impacting their ability to provide sustained support to the person with cancer (4).
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherFrontiers Media
dc.relation.ispartofissueOCT
dc.relation.ispartofjournalFrontiers in Oncology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume5
dc.subject.fieldofresearchOncology and Carcinogenesis
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1112
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsOncology
dc.subject.keywordsneuro-oncology
dc.subject.keywordsbrain neoplasms
dc.titleEditorial: Psychosocial advances in neuro-oncology
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC3 - Articles (Letter/ Note)
dcterms.bibliographicCitationOwnsworth, T; Chambers, SK; Dhillon, HM, Editorial: Psychosocial advances in neuro-oncology, Frontiers in Oncology, 2015, 5 (OCT)
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-10-13
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.date.updated2020-02-28T01:00:29Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2015 Ownsworth, Chambers and Dhillon. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorChambers, Suzanne K.
gro.griffith.authorOwnsworth, Tamara


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