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dc.contributor.authorRourke, MF
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-06T01:19:55Z
dc.date.available2020-03-06T01:19:55Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn1320-159X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/392138
dc.description.abstractThe United Nations' Convention on Biological Diversity (1992) (CBD) has become the focal point for the regulation of traditional knowledge (TK) held by indigenous and local communities (ILCs). The legally binding CBD is bolstered by a supplementary, non-binding agreement, The Nagoya Protocol on Access to Genetic Resources and the Fair and Equitable Sharing of Benefits Arising from their Utilization (2010) (Nagoya Protocol). Both instruments create the conditions for the access and benefit-sharing (ABS) of genetic resources, and for TK associated with those resources. There has been no consideration as to how TK might factor into virus ABS arrangements. Most of the literature on these issues relates to how the TK provisions of the CBD and Nagoya Protocol should be implemented; there is little guidance as to how to interpret the text itself. This article provides a textual analysis of all provisions of the CBD and Nagoya Protocol that relate to TK and the interests of ILCs. The analysis clarifies the differences in scope between the two instruments and will provide some insights as to how to interpret key terms, particularly "indigenous and local communities", "traditional knowledge" and "traditional knowledge associated with genetic resources". This is critical to understanding the obligations that apply to accessing virus samples that are regulated as genetic resources under the CBD.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherThomson Reuters
dc.publisher.urihttp://sites.thomsonreuters.com.au/journals/2018/04/09/journal-of-law-and-medicine-update-vol-25-pt-3/
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom707
dc.relation.ispartofpageto726
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Law and Medicine
dc.relation.ispartofvolume25
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLaw and Legal Studies
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPhilosophy and Religious Studies
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode18
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode22
dc.subject.keywordsVirus
dc.subject.keywordsAccess and Benefit-Sharing
dc.subject.keywordsTraditional Knowledge
dc.subject.keywordsConvention on Biological Diversity
dc.subject.keywordsNagoya Protocol
dc.titleWho Are "Indigenous and Local Communities" and What Is "Traditional Knowledge" for Virus Access and Benefit-sharing? A Textual Analysis of the Convention on Biological Diversity and Its Nagoya Protocol
dc.typeJournal article
dcterms.bibliographicCitationRourke, M, Who Are "Indigenous and Local Communities" and What Is "Traditional Knowledge" for Virus Access and Benefit-sharing? A Textual Analysis of the Convention on Biological Diversity and Its Nagoya Protocol, Journal of Law and Medicine, 25 (3), 707-726, 2018
dc.date.updated2020-03-06T01:17:03Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorRourke, Michelle F.


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