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dc.contributor.authorBrubacher, Sonja P
dc.contributor.authorPowell, Martine B
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Kim P
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-06T03:52:43Z
dc.date.available2020-03-06T03:52:43Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn1076-8971
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/law0000011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/392148
dc.description.abstractFor just over 2 decades, researchers have been conducting empirical studies devoted to understanding children's memory for, and ability to describe, individual occurrences of events they have experienced repeatedly. This knowledge is critical because children making allegations of repeated abuse are required to provide details particular to an individual incident in many jurisdictions internationally. Much of this work has thus far been conducted in rigorously controlled analog settings, and empirical study of their generalizability to the context of field interviews is urgently needed. We outline in detail the empirical and theoretical foundations that underlie a set of specific suggestions that practitioners might consider when assisting children to report as much information as possible about individual occurrences of repeated abuse. Our recommendations cover both presubstantive (i.e., "practice") and substantive phases of the interview. The particular challenges involved with describing individual incidents of repeated events are discussed, followed by evidence-based guidelines aimed at overcoming these difficulties. We highlight research that has included comparisons between lab and field data, and draw attention to areas of understanding that require further validation in forensic interviews. The inaugural guidelines we present are not meant as a replacement to existing best-practice interviews, but to serve as more detailed procedures in cases of repeated allegations. © 2014 American Psychological Association.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherAmerican Physical Society
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom325
dc.relation.ispartofpageto335
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPsychology, Public Policy, and Law
dc.relation.ispartofvolume20
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolicy and Administration
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLaw
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1605
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1801
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciences
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsHealth Policy & Services
dc.titleRecommendations for Interviewing Children About Repeated Experiences
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationBrubacher, SP; Powell, MB; Roberts, KP, Recommendations for Interviewing Children About Repeated Experiences, Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, 2014, 20 (3), pp. 325-335
dc.date.updated2020-03-06T03:49:43Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 American Psycological Association. This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record. Reproduced here in accordance with publisher policy. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBrubacher, Sonja
gro.griffith.authorPowell, Martine B.


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