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dc.contributor.authorBrubacher, Sonja P
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Kim P
dc.contributor.authorPowell, Martine
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-06T04:24:56Z
dc.date.available2020-03-06T04:24:56Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.issn1076-8971
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/a0022793
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/392156
dc.description.abstractChildren (N = 240) ages 5 to 8 years participated in 1 or 4 activity sessions involving interactive tasks (e.g., completing a puzzle); children with single-event participation served as a control group. One week after their last/only session, all children were practiced in episodic recall of unrelated experiences by asking about either the (a) a single-experience event, (b) a specific instance of a repeated event, or (c) scripted recall of a series of events. Children were subsequently interviewed in an open-ended, nonsuggestive manner about 1 of the activity sessions; children with repeated experience were permitted to nominate the session they wanted to talk about. For children who participated 4 times, practice recalling a specific instance benefited 5- and 6-year-old children most; they reported more target details than other conditions and showed awareness of the repeated nature of the activity sessions. Accuracy levels were maintained regardless of practice type. Children with single-event experience were largely unaffected by manipulation of practice condition. Practical implications for interviews with child victim/witnesses and theoretical implications on children's ability to recall specific incidents of repeated events are discussed. © 2011 American Psychological Association.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherAMER PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOC
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom286
dc.relation.ispartofpageto314
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPsychology, Public Policy, and Law
dc.relation.ispartofvolume17
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolicy and Administration
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLaw
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1605
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1801
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciences
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsHealth Policy & Services
dc.titleEffects of practicing episodic versus scripted recall on children's subsequent narratives of a repeated event
dc.typeJournal article
dcterms.bibliographicCitationBrubacher, SP; Roberts, KP; Powell, M, EEffects of practicing episodic versus scripted recall on children's subsequent narratives of a repeated event., Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, 2011, 17 (2), pp. 286-314
dc.date.updated2020-03-06T04:22:36Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBrubacher, Sonja
gro.griffith.authorPowell, Martine B.


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