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dc.contributor.authorSharpe, E
dc.contributor.authorKuhn, L
dc.contributor.authorRatz, D
dc.contributor.authorKrein, SL
dc.contributor.authorChopra, V
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-09T06:36:35Z
dc.date.available2020-03-09T06:36:35Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn1536-0903
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/ANC.0000000000000376
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/392216
dc.description.abstractBackground: Neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) commonly utilize peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) to provide nutrition and long-term medications to premature and full-term infants. However, little is known about PICC practices in these settings. Purpose: To assess PICC practices, policies, and providers in NICUs. Methods: The Neonatal PICC1 Survey was conducted through the use of the electronic mailing list of a national neonatal professional organization's electronic membership community. Questions addressed PICC-related policies, monitoring, practices, and providers. Descriptive statistics were used to assess results. Results: Of the 156 respondents accessing the survey, 115 (73.7%) indicated that they placed PICCs as part of their daily occupation. Of these, 110 responded to at least one question (70.5%) and were included in the study. Reported use of evidence-based practices by NICU providers varied. For example, routine use of maximum sterile barriers was reported by 90.4% of respondents; however, the use of chlorhexidine gluconate for skin disinfection was reported only by 49.4% of respondents. A majority of respondents indicated that trained PICC nurses were largely responsible for routine PICC dressing changes (61.0%). Normal saline was reported as the most frequently used flushing solution (46.3%). The most common PICC-related complications in neonates were catheter migration and occlusion. Implications for Practice: Variable practices, including the use of chlorhexidine-based solutions for skin disinfection and inconsistent flushing, exist. There is a need for development of consistent monitoring to improve patient outcomes. Implications for Research: Future research should include exploration of specific PICC practices, associated conditions, and outcomes.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWolters Kluwer
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom209
dc.relation.ispartofpageto221
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAdvances in Neonatal Care
dc.relation.ispartofvolume17
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPaediatrics and Reproductive Medicine
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1114
dc.titleNeonatal Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Practices and Providers
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationSharpe, E; Kuhn, L; Ratz, D; Krein, SL; Chopra, V, Neonatal Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Practices and Providers, Advances in Neonatal Care, 2017, 17 (3), pp. 209-221
dc.date.updated2020-03-09T06:35:37Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorChopra, Vineet


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