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dc.contributor.authorGilmartin, H
dc.contributor.authorGoyal, A
dc.contributor.authorHamati, MC
dc.contributor.authorMann, J
dc.contributor.authorSaint, S
dc.contributor.authorChopra, V
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-10T00:16:23Z
dc.date.available2020-03-10T00:16:23Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn0002-9343
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.amjmed.2017.05.041
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/392243
dc.description.abstractMindfulness practice, where an individual maintains openness, patience, and acceptance while focusing attention on a situation in a nonjudgmental way, can improve symptoms of anxiety, burnout, and depression. The practice is relevant for health care providers; however, the time commitment is a barrier to practice. For this reason, brief mindfulness interventions (eg, ≤ 4 hours) are being introduced. We systematically reviewed the literature from inception to January 2017 about the effects of brief mindfulness interventions on provider well-being and behavior. Studies that tested a brief mindfulness intervention with hospital providers and measured change in well-being (eg, stress) or behavior (eg, tasks of attention or reduction of clinical or diagnostic errors) were selected for narrative synthesis. Fourteen studies met inclusion criteria; 7 were randomized controlled trials. Nine of 14 studies reported positive changes in levels of stress, anxiety, mindfulness, resiliency, and burnout symptoms. No studies found an effect on provider behavior. Brief mindfulness interventions may be effective in improving provider well-being; however, larger studies are needed to assess an impact on clinical care.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1219.e1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1219.e17
dc.relation.ispartofissue10
dc.relation.ispartofjournalThe American Journal of Medicine
dc.relation.ispartofvolume130
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.subject.keywordsHealth care providers
dc.subject.keywordsInpatient
dc.subject.keywordsMindfulness
dc.subject.keywordsSystematic literature review
dc.subject.keywordsWell-being
dc.titleBrief Mindfulness Practices for Healthcare Providers – A Systematic Literature Review
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationGilmartin, H; Goyal, A; Hamati, MC; Mann, J; Saint, S; Chopra, V, Brief Mindfulness Practices for Healthcare Providers – A Systematic Literature Review, The American Journal of Medicine, 2017, 130 (10), pp. 1219.e1-1219.e17
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-05-31
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.date.updated2020-03-10T00:12:30Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2017 Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorChopra, Vineet


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