Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPetrilli, CM
dc.contributor.authorSaint, S
dc.contributor.authorJennings, JJ
dc.contributor.authorCaruso, A
dc.contributor.authorKuhn, L
dc.contributor.authorSnyder, A
dc.contributor.authorChopra, V
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-17T04:27:27Z
dc.date.available2020-03-17T04:27:27Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn2044-6055
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjopen-2017-021239
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/392388
dc.description.abstractObjective Several large studies have shown that improving the patient experience is associated with higher reported patient satisfaction, increased adherence to treatment and clinical outcomes. Whether physician attire can affect the patient experience-and how this influences satisfaction-is unknown. Therefore, we performed a national, cross-sectional study to examine patient perceptions, expectations and preferences regarding physicians dress. Setting 10 academic hospitals in the USA. Participants Convenience sample of 4062 patients recruited from 1 June 2015 to 31 October 2016. Primary and secondary outcomes measures We conducted a questionnaire-based study of patients across 10 academic hospitals in the USA. The questionnaire included photographs of a male and female physician dressed in seven different forms of attire. Patients were asked to rate the provider pictured in various clinical settings. Preference for attire was calculated as the composite of responses across five domains (knowledgeable, trustworthy, caring, approachable and comfortable) via a standardised instrument. Secondary outcome measures included variation in preferences by respondent characteristics (eg, gender), context of care (eg, inpatient vs outpatient) and geographical region. Results Of 4062 patient responses, 53% indicated that physician attire was important to them during care. Over one-Third agreed that it influenced their satisfaction with care. Compared with all other forms of attire, formal attire with a white coat was most highly rated (p=0.001 vs scrubs with white coat; p<0.001 all other comparisons). Important differences in preferences for attire by clinical context and respondent characteristics were noted. For example, respondents≥65 years preferred formal attire with white coats (p<0.001) while scrubs were most preferred for surgeons. Conclusions Patients have important expectations and perceptions for physician dress that vary by context and region. Nuanced policies addressing physician dress code to improve patient satisfaction appear important.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group Ltd
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrome021239:1
dc.relation.ispartofpagetoe021239:9
dc.relation.ispartofissue5
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBMJ Open
dc.relation.ispartofvolume8
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchOther Medical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1199
dc.subject.keywordshealth policy
dc.subject.keywordsinfection control
dc.subject.keywordspublic health
dc.subject.keywordsqualitative research
dc.subject.keywordsquality in health care
dc.titleUnderstanding patient preference for physician attire: A cross-sectional observational study of 10 academic medical centres in the USA
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationPetrilli, CM; Saint, S; Jennings, JJ; Caruso, A; Kuhn, L; Snyder, A; Chopra, V, Understanding patient preference for physician attire: A cross-sectional observational study of 10 academic medical centres in the USA, BMJ Open, 2018, 8 (5), pp. e021239:1-e021239:9
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.date.updated2020-03-17T03:45:21Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorChopra, Vineet


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record