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dc.contributor.advisorFragar, Julie F
dc.contributor.authorBunyasakseri, Thirawut
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-17T06:35:53Z
dc.date.available2020-03-17T06:35:53Z
dc.date.issued2020-03-09
dc.identifier.doi10.25904/1912/110
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/392408
dc.description.abstractArt has been a form of communication used to convey religious lessons in Thailand (formerly the Kingdom of Siam) since ancient times. While present-day Thais are still intensely committed to religious practices, many understand less and less of the precise information embedded in this art form. Moreover, religious artworks in Thailand do not reflect current society and do not have much in common with contemporary art. Therefore, this research investigates the potential causes that have disconnected religious art from Thai society and explores possible ways to utilise elements from the Thai religious art style in a contemporary painting practice. This research is primarily a studio-based investigation, but is supported by traditional discursive research practices, including a historical and contemporary analysis of the original functions and the evolution of painting styles of religious art, specifically Ramayana-inspired paintings across periods of times and regions. Relevant theories regarding iconology and visual representation are employed to guide the understanding and interpretation of these religious paintings. This research also investigates the interrelation between art and nationalist ideology after the political regime change in Thailand during the 19th century. The new state system intensely sought to promote national identity and imbued religious art with a new meaning that supported this nation building. What is now known as Thai “traditional” art has strict rules in place in terms of preservation, reproduction, and standardisation. Also, part of the pre-studio research was a visual survey I undertook of relevant artworks, including a range of contemporary paintings which utilise elements from traditional art to create works that reflect contemporary society. In the studio section of this creative research, I have created four series of paintings that experiment with the artistic value inherent in traditional art and attempt to modernise Thai traditional painting, making it meaningful to contemporary audiences. This may not only offer another way of creating religious painting but could also possibly be another method of preservation, ensuring the longevity of Thai traditional art.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherGriffith University
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
dc.subject.keywordsstudio-based research
dc.subject.keywordsArt
dc.subject.keywordstraditional discursive research practices
dc.subject.keywordsRamayana-inspired paintings
dc.subject.keywordsThailand
dc.subject.keywordsKingdom of Siam
dc.subject.keywordsThai traditional art
dc.titleTimeless Stories: Investigating Contemporary Approaches to Hindu and Buddhist Art
dc.typeGriffith thesis
gro.facultyArts, Education and Law
gro.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorWoodrow, Ross D
gro.identifier.gurtID000000022082
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (Professional Doctorate)
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Visual Arts (DVA)
gro.departmentQueensland College of Art
gro.griffith.authorBunyasakseri, Thirawut


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