Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorVincent, Stephen J
dc.contributor.authorAlonso-Caneiro, David
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Michael J
dc.contributor.authorBeanland, Alison
dc.contributor.authorLam, Linda
dc.contributor.authorLim, Ching Chong
dc.contributor.authorLoke, Alyssa
dc.contributor.authorNhi, Nguyen
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-20T01:32:23Z
dc.date.available2020-03-20T01:32:23Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn1040-5488
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/OPX.0000000000000803
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/392493
dc.description.abstractCopyright © 2016 American Academy of Optometry. Purpose. To examine the change in corneal thickness and posterior curvature following 8 hours of miniscleral contact lens wear. Methods. Scheimpflug imaging (Pentacam HR; Oculus) was captured before, and immediately following, 8 hours of miniscleral contact lens wear for 15 young (mean age 22 T 3 years), healthy participants with normal corneae. Natural diurnal variations were considered by measuring baseline corneal changes obtained on a separate control day without contact lens wear. Results. Over the central 6 mm of the cornea, a small but highly statistically significant amount of edema was observed following 8 hours of miniscleral lens wear, after accounting for normal diurnal fluctuations (mean T standard deviation percentage swelling 1.70 T 0.98%, p < 0.0001). Posterior corneal topography remained stable following lens wear (j0.01 ± 0.07 mm steepening over the central 6 mm, p = 0.60). The magnitude of posterior corneal topographical changes following lens wear did not correlate with the extent of lens-related corneal edema (r = j0.16, p = 0.57). Similarly, the initial central corneal vault (maximum post-lens tear layer depth) was not associated with corneal swelling following lens removal (r = 0.27, p = 0.33). Conclusions. Although a small amount of corneal swelling was induced following 8 hours of miniscleral lens wear (on average <2%), modern high Dk miniscleral contact lenses that vault the cornea do not induce clinically significant corneal edema or hypoxic-related posterior corneal curvature changes during short-Term wear. Longer-Term studies of compromised eyes (e.g. corneal ectasia) are still required to inform the optimum lens and fitting characteristics for safe scleral lens wear to minimize corneal hypoxia.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom293
dc.relation.ispartofpageto299
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalOptometry and Vision Science
dc.relation.ispartofvolume93
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiomedical and clinical sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode32
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsOphthalmology
dc.subject.keywordsminiscleral contact lens
dc.subject.keywordscorneal edema
dc.titleHypoxic Corneal Changes following Eight Hours of Scleral Contact Lens Wear
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationVincent, SJ; Alonso-Caneiro, D; Collins, MJ; Beanland, A; Lam, L; Lim, CC; Loke, A; Nhi, N, Hypoxic Corneal Changes following Eight Hours of Scleral Contact Lens Wear, Optometry and Vision Science, 2016, 93 (3), pp. 293-299
dc.date.updated2020-03-20T01:19:11Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2016 LWW. This is a non-final version of an article published in final form in Optometry and Vision Science, 016, 93 (3), pp. 293-299. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorAlonso-Caneiro, David


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record