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dc.contributor.authorHoang-Phuon, Phan
dc.contributor.authorZhong, Yishan
dc.contributor.authorTuan-Khoa, Nguyen
dc.contributor.authorPark, Yoonseok
dc.contributor.authorToan, Dinh
dc.contributor.authorSong, Enming
dc.contributor.authorVadivelu, Raja Kumar
dc.contributor.authorMasud, Mostafa Kamal
dc.contributor.authorLi, Jinghua
dc.contributor.authorShiddiky, Muhammad JA
dc.contributor.authorDao, Dzung
dc.contributor.authorYamauchi, Yusuke
dc.contributor.authorRogers, John A
dc.contributor.authorNam-Trung, Nguyen
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-23T00:15:00Z
dc.date.available2020-03-23T00:15:00Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1936-0851
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/acsnano.9b05168
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/392524
dc.description.abstractImplantable electronics are of great interest owing to their capability for real-time and continuous recording of cellular–electrical activity. Nevertheless, as such systems involve direct interfaces with surrounding biofluidic environments, maintaining their long-term sustainable operation, without leakage currents or corrosion, is a daunting challenge. Herein, we present a thin, flexible semiconducting material system that offers attractive attributes in this context. The material consists of crystalline cubic silicon carbide nanomembranes grown on silicon wafers, released and then physically transferred to a final device substrate (e.g., polyimide). The experimental results demonstrate that SiC nanomembranes with thicknesses of 230 nm do not experience the hydrolysis process (i.e., the etching rate is 0 nm/day at 96 °C in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)). There is no observable water permeability for at least 60 days in PBS at 96 °C and non-Na+ ion diffusion detected at a thickness of 50 nm after being soaked in 1× PBS for 12 days. These properties enable Faradaic interfaces between active electronics and biological tissues, as well as multimodal sensing of temperature, strain, and other properties without the need for additional encapsulating layers. These findings create important opportunities for use of flexible, wide band gap materials as essential components of long-lived neurological and cardiac electrophysiological device interfaces.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom11572
dc.relation.ispartofpageto11581
dc.relation.ispartofissue10
dc.relation.ispartofjournalACS Nano
dc.relation.ispartofvolume13
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEngineering
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode09
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsPhysical Sciences
dc.subject.keywordsTechnology
dc.subject.keywordsChemistry, Multidisciplinary
dc.subject.keywordsChemistry, Physical
dc.titleLong-Lived, Transferred Crystalline Silicon Carbide Nanomembranes for Implantable Flexible Electronics
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationHoang-Phuon, P; Zhong, Y; Tuan-Khoa, N; Park, Y; Toan, D; Song, E; Vadivelu, RK; Masud, MK; Li, J; Shiddiky, MJA; Dao, D; Yamauchi, Y; Rogers, JA; Nam-Trung, N, Long-Lived, Transferred Crystalline Silicon Carbide Nanomembranes for Implantable Flexible Electronics, ACS Nano, 2019, 13 (10), pp. 11572-11581
dc.date.updated2020-03-23T00:06:53Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorDao, Dzung V.
gro.griffith.authorShiddiky, Muhammad J.
gro.griffith.authorDinh, Toan K.
gro.griffith.authorPhan, Hoang Phuong
gro.griffith.authorNguyen Tuan, Khoa
gro.griffith.authorVadivelu, Raja
gro.griffith.authorNguyen, Nam-Trung
gro.griffith.authorMasud, Mostafa Kamal K.


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