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dc.contributor.authorZhang, Yanbo
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Yangsen
dc.contributor.authorWang, Yibao
dc.contributor.authorCasey, Tristan W
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-29T23:25:42Z
dc.date.available2020-03-29T23:25:42Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn0022-4375
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jsr.2020.02.014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/392728
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: The existing literature on mobile phone use while driving (MPUWD) mainly targets the participants from general population and the young adults, however, few studies pay attention to this form of distracted driving with samples in professional contexts. The present study aims to bridge the gap by identifying the extent of and the motives behind making use of mobile phones while driving for food dispatch among deliveryman. Method: The snowball sampling was used to collect the data (N = 317) through a self-reported questionnaire, including demographics, personality traits, risk perception, driving self-efficacy, and mobile phone use while driving. Results: Descriptive analysis for the assessed MPUWD behaviors showed that 96.3% (N = 315) of food deliveryman undertook the MPUWD behaviors, though disproportionate distribution among these behaviors existed. Structural equation modeling analysis displayed that psychoticism and driving self-efficacy directly predicted the MPUWD behaviors. The mediating role of driving self-efficacy was verified with the findings that driving self-efficacy completely mediated the relationships that between risk perception and MPUWD behaviors and that between extraversion and MPUWD behaviors, as well as partially mediated the correlation between psychoticism and MPUWD behaviors. Conclusions: The present study confirms the prevalence of MPUWD behaviors among food deliveryman. The SEM estimates and bootstrap estimates suggest that personality traits and perceived risk perception per se display limited predicting utility to MPUWD behaviors among food deliveryman, whereas driving self-efficacy and the proposed predictors together well illustrate the assessed MPUWD behaviors among food deliveryman. Practical Applications: These findings imply that developing and implementing intervention efforts in a concerted way would curb these behaviors effectively.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom69
dc.relation.ispartofpageto80
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Safety Research
dc.relation.ispartofvolume73
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBusiness and Management
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1503
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.titleWho uses a mobile phone while driving for food delivery? The role of personality, risk perception, and driving self-efficacy
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationZhang, Y; Huang, Y; Wang, Y; Casey, TW, Who uses a mobile phone while driving for food delivery? The role of personality, risk perception, and driving self-efficacy, Journal of Safety Research, 2020, 73, pp. 69-80
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.date.updated2020-03-27T06:24:01Z
dc.description.versionPost-print
gro.rights.copyright© 2020 National Safety Council and Elsevier Ltd. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorCasey, Tristan W.


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