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dc.contributor.authorHurley, Erin
dc.contributor.authorDietrich, Timo
dc.contributor.authorRundle-Thiele, Sharyn
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-31T01:12:49Z
dc.date.available2020-03-31T01:12:49Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12889-019-7733-x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/392788
dc.description.abstractBackground: Adolescent alcohol consumption is an issue of ongoing concern and programs targeting parents have been identified as an important component in minimizing and preventing alcohol related harm in adolescents. This paper aims to evaluate existing parent based alcohol education programs with a focus on understanding parent specific outcomes including parental attitudes, parent-child communication, alcohol specific rule setting and parental monitoring; study quality, the extent of stakeholder engagement in program design and the level of theory application. Method: A systematic review of electronic databases EBSCO, Emerald, ProQuest, PubMed, Ovid, ScienceDirect, Taylor and Francis and Web of Science was conducted from database inception to August 2019. A total of 4288 unique records were retrieved from the eight databases. Studies were included if they evaluated school based alcohol education programs that included a parent component and detailed outcome measures associated with parent data. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed using the Effective Public Health Practice Project (EPHPP) quality assessment tool. Results: In total 17 studies qualified for assessment, detailing 13 individual parent programs. Of these, ten programs demonstrated positive effects in at least one parent reported outcome measure. Stakeholder engagement during the design of programs was lacking with the majority of programs. One third of the programs did not report theory use and when theory was used reporting was weak with three programs applying theory, five testing theory and none building theory. According to the EPHPP tool, overall ten programs were rated as weak, three as moderate and none as strong. Conclusion: Future studies are recommended to further enhance the effectiveness of parental programs by improving study quality, increasing stakeholder engagement and increasing the level of theory application and reporting.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherBMC
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBMC Public Health
dc.relation.ispartofvolume19
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsPublic, Environmental & Occupational Health
dc.subject.keywordsParent
dc.subject.keywordsReview
dc.titleA systematic review of parent based programs to prevent or reduce alcohol consumption in adolescents
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationHurley, E; Dietrich, T; Rundle-Thiele, S, A systematic review of parent based programs to prevent or reduce alcohol consumption in adolescents, BMC Public Health, 2019, 19 (1)
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-10-09
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.date.updated2020-03-31T01:09:08Z
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 The Authors. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorRundle-Thiele, Sharyn
gro.griffith.authorHurley, Erin L.
gro.griffith.authorDietrich, Timo H.


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