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dc.contributor.convenorRay Markeyen_AU
dc.contributor.authorHarpur, Paulen_US
dc.contributor.authorPeetz, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.editorFrances Laneyrie, Lizzie Li and Ray Markeyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T10:32:37Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T10:32:37Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2011-06-29T08:10:04Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://airaanz.eventsmart.co.nz/en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/39296
dc.description.abstractThe corporate social responsibility (CSR) movement pressures corporations to reject the shareholder primacy model of corporate governance in favour of multiple objectives. We examine how effective market forces are at ensuring CSR in relation to the application of labour standards within multinational supply chains and locate this in the context of theory of the corporation. As corporations are primarily motivated to engage in CSR to protect their corporate image, they will attempt to do so at the lowest possible cost, which does not necessarily mean improving labour conditions in factories. Many corporations have countered negative CSR publicity by adopting sophisticated campaigns to improve corporate image without improving respect for human rights. Major US corporations pressure governments to avoid binding them to human rights standards, as these would restrict their competitive edge internationally. The high degree of control exercised by finance capital means that the focus on profit maximisation is stronger now than at any time over the previous century. Any attempts to promote responsible corporate behaviour must eventually feature codes of conduct that are verifiable and create legal responsibility.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent203875 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAssociation of Industrial Relations Academics of Australia and New Zealanden_US
dc.publisher.placeAuckland, New Zealanden_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://airaanz.eventsmart.co.nz/conference-papers/en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencename25th AIRAANZ Conference 2011en_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleDialogue Downunder: Proceedings of the 25th Conference of the Association of Industrial Relations Academics of Australia and New Zealand (AIRAANZ)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2011-02-01en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2011-02-04en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationAuckland, New Zealanden_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchIndustrial Relationsen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode150306en_US
dc.titleIs Corporate Social Responsibility In Labour Standards An Oxymoron?en_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Lawen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2011 AIRAANZ. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the conference's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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