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dc.contributor.authorDowell, Tiah L
dc.contributor.authorWaters, Allison M
dc.contributor.authorUsher, Wayne
dc.contributor.authorFarrell, Lara J
dc.contributor.authorDonovan, Caroline L
dc.contributor.authorModecki, Kathryn L
dc.contributor.authorZimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J
dc.contributor.authorCastle, Mike
dc.contributor.authorHinchey, James
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-14T00:10:14Z
dc.date.available2020-04-14T00:10:14Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn0009-398X
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10578-020-00984-9
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/393038
dc.description.abstractLinking mental health services to organised sport offers an avenue to identify and improve mental health among adolescents. In this study, we investigated the efficacy, acceptability and feasibility of an integrated mental health system embedded within a junior sports development program. A three-step integrated mental health program for 12- to 15-year-old rugby league players (N = 74) was delivered in urban (n = 44) and rural (n = 33) areas. Specifically, this system (a) assessed participant mental health on primary outcome measures of anxiety, depression, and anger/conduct problems (and secondary outcome measures of personal attributes and relationships), (b) provided feedback to participants, parents and program coordinators, and (c) connected participants and parents to a multi-component intervention including online resources, a group-based workshop program (4 × 30-min sessions), and tailored individual-level follow-up and referral to further care for participants at high risk of mental health problems. From pre- to post-program, boys’ anxiety symptoms declined significantly (with only a trend-level reduction in depression), and there were significant improvements in grit (for urban boys only), efficacy to manage negative emotions, and prosocial behaviour. In addition, when boys reported symptoms associated with high risk for mental health problems, providing parents with feedback enhanced boys’ access to care and was associated with significant declines in anxiety symptoms. The program was generally acceptable and feasible, with very high retention in the youth sports development program. Overall, early findings support further deployment and evaluation of integrated mental health systems embedded within sporting contexts to address mental health problems among adolescent boys.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.relation.ispartofjournalChild Psychiatry & Human Development
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPaediatrics and Reproductive Medicine
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1114
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.titleTackling Mental Health in Youth Sporting Programs: A Pilot Study of a Holistic Program
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationDowell, TL; Waters, AM; Usher, W; Farrell, LJ; Donovan, CL; Modecki, KL; Zimmer-Gembeck, MJ; Castle, M; Hinchey, J, Tackling Mental Health in Youth Sporting Programs: A Pilot Study of a Holistic Program, Child Psychiatry & Human Development
dc.date.updated2020-04-07T03:11:14Z
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorUsher, Wayne T.
gro.griffith.authorDonovan, Caroline L.
gro.griffith.authorFarrell, Lara J.
gro.griffith.authorModecki, Kathryn L.
gro.griffith.authorDowell, Tiah L.
gro.griffith.authorWaters, Allison M.
gro.griffith.authorZimmer-Gembeck, Melanie


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