Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHendry, Kathryn
dc.contributor.authorOwnsworth, Tamara
dc.contributor.authorWaters, Allison M
dc.contributor.authorJackson, Megan
dc.contributor.authorLloyd, Owen
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-14T03:09:33Z
dc.date.available2020-04-14T03:09:33Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn0929-7049
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09297049.2020.1750577
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/393056
dc.description.abstractFew studies have examined the self-reported mental health of children with an acquired brain injury (ABI). The current study aimed to: 1) identify levels of child-reported depressive and anxiety symptoms and poor self-concept, 2) investigate demographic and injury-related factors associated with children’s mood and self-concept, and 3) examine associations between children’s self-reported mental health and parents’ reports of children’s emotional and behavioral functioning in children specifically with traumatic brain injury (TBI). 122 children (66% male) aged 8–16 years with ABI of mixed etiology were consecutively recruited through an outpatient rehabilitation clinic. Children were administered the Beck Youth Inventories – Second Edition, and parents completed the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System and the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Relative to the norms, 16.4% of children scored in the clinical range for the depression and anxiety scales, and 24.6% reported clinically low self-concept. Children with lower functional status had greater anxiety symptoms. Older children (13–16 years) reported significantly higher depressive and anxiety symptoms and lower self-concept than younger children (8–12 years). A significant interaction between age and sex indicated that older girls reported greater depressive and anxiety symptoms than younger girls whereas no age-based differences were found for boys. Parent-reported total emotional and behavioral problems were positively associated with children’s self-reported depressive and anxiety symptoms and were negatively correlated with self-concept. These findings indicate that adolescents, particularly girls, may be at heightened risk of poor mental health following ABI. Further research investigating the reasons for these demographic differences may inform developmentally sensitive interventions.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherInforma UK Limited
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto21
dc.relation.ispartofjournalChild Neuropsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology and Cognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode17
dc.subject.keywordsAcquired brain injury
dc.subject.keywordschild
dc.subject.keywordsmental health
dc.subject.keywordsmood
dc.subject.keywordsself-concept
dc.titleInvestigation of children and adolescents' mood and self-concept after acquired brain injury
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationHendry, K; Ownsworth, T; Waters, AM; Jackson, M; Lloyd, O, Investigation of children and adolescents' mood and self-concept after acquired brain injury., Child Neuropsychology, 2020, pp. 1-21
dc.date.updated2020-04-08T23:12:34Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.rights.copyrightThis is an Author's Accepted Manuscript of an article published in Child Neuropsychology, 07 Apr 2020, copyright Taylor & Francis, available online at: https://doi.org/10.1080/09297049.2020.1750577
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorWaters, Allison M.
gro.griffith.authorOwnsworth, Tamara
gro.griffith.authorLloyd, Owen T.
gro.griffith.authorHendry, Kathryn M.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record