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dc.contributor.authorBrowne, Vivienne
dc.contributor.authorMunro, Jonathan
dc.contributor.authorCass, Jeremy
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-14T03:43:45Z
dc.date.available2020-04-14T03:43:45Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn1320-2480
dc.identifier.doi10.30688/janzssa.2017.16
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/393061
dc.description.abstractAustralian and international research suggests university students are experiencing heightened psychological distress, in part due to academic and financial pressures, isolation, loneliness and poor self-care. University years also often coincide with the critical transition period (between the ages of 17 and 25 years) when mental illness is most likely to onset. While the Australian Government’s higher education policies have driven increases in participation and equity, little attention has been given to supporting the ‘mental wealth’ of students and responding to experiences (and risk factors) of mental ill-health which can place them at risk of academic failure. Further, mental health and suicide prevention policies across all levels of government have focused on providing educational support within primary and secondary school settings and largely ignored the role of tertiary education. This is despite the significant numbers of Australian young people engaged in these settings. There remains contention about the extent of the problem and whether the core business of higher education delivery includes supporting students’ mental health and wellbeing. Regardless, universities across Australia have been independently developing policies and programs to respond to mental health issues presenting on campus. As such, national leadership and guidance is needed to: a) improve data collection on the prevalence of mental ill-health among university students; b) articulate the reasonable expectations of universities in responding to students’ mental health issues; c) describe opportunities for partnership between universities and community mental health services; and d) promote evidence-based, appropriate and acceptable programs and interventions.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.publisherAustralian and New Zealand Student Services Association
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom51
dc.relation.ispartofpageto62
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of the Australia and New Zealand Student Services Association
dc.relation.ispartofvolume25
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation Systems
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSpecialist Studies in Education
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1301
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1303
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.titleUnder the Radar: The Mental Health of Australian University Students
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationBrowne, V, Under the Radar: The Mental Health of Australian University Students, Journal of the Australia and New Zealand Student Services Association, 25 (2), pp. 51-62
dc.date.updated2020-04-14T01:52:52Z
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.rights.copyright© 2017 ANZSSA. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorMunro, Jonathan


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