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dc.contributor.authorGreen, Daniel R
dc.contributor.authorCote, Susanne
dc.contributor.authorDirks, Wendy
dc.contributor.authorReid, Donald J
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Ian S
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Tanya M
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-20T22:23:47Z
dc.date.available2020-04-20T22:23:47Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn0002-9483
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ajpa.24023
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/393274
dc.description.abstractEnvironmental seasonality is commonly invoked as a driver of novel adaptation and evolution in great apes and hominins, but is difܪcult to reconstruct in association with fossil remains. Here we measure seasonally variable oxygen isotope compositions (Ƚ18O) in two early Miocene Afropithecus turkanensis molars from Kalodirr, Kenya, using a Sensitive High Resolution Ion Microprobe (SHRIMP SI). Standardized Ƚ18O values sampled along the enamel-dentine junction are related to temporal records of enamel formation. To situate Afropithecus specimens ecologically, we collected comparative SHRIMP Ƚ18O data from molars of two recent Liberian chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) and ܪve Ethiopian baboons (Papio hamadryas) from the Awash National Park. Sequential Afropithecus measurements reveal annual seasonal ܫuctuations in Ƚ18O values that span 7.6 ‰ across both molars (range = 19.3–26.9 ‰). The range in Afropithecus is slightly less than that observed in chimpanzees (range = 13.1–21.8 ‰), but exceeds baboons (range = 23.0–28.8 ‰). Ƚ18O values in Afropithecus are intermediate between those of forest-dwelling chimpanzees and grassland baboons, and are consistent with inferences from other sources that Kalodirr may have included mosaic environments. Our results also provide environmental context in support of characterizations of Afropithecus as a thick-enameled hard-object feeder. Spatially precise and developmentally informed microsampling strategies have the potential to recover seasonal climatic and behavior patterns as long ago as the early Miocene, and will contribute to elucidating the complex relationship between seasonality, primate behavior, and evolution.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.ispartofconferencename89th Annual Meeting of the American-Association-of-Physical-Anthropologists (AAPA)
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleAmerican Journal of Physical Anthropology
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2020-04-15
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2020-04-18
dc.relation.ispartoflocationLos Angeles, CA, USA
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom106
dc.relation.ispartofpageto106
dc.relation.ispartofissueS69
dc.relation.ispartofvolume171
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEvolutionary Biology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAnthropology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchArchaeology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0603
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1601
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2101
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.titleSeasonal Isotope Ecology in the East African Miocene Ape Afropithecus
dc.typeConference output
dc.type.descriptionE3 - Conferences (Extract Paper)
dcterms.bibliographicCitationGreen, DR; Cote, S; Dirks, W; Reid, DJ; Williams, IS; Smith, TM, Seasonal Isotope Ecology in the East African Miocene Ape Afropithecus, American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 2020, 171, pp. 106-106
dc.date.updated2020-04-20T22:22:06Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorSmith, Tanya M.


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