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dc.contributor.authorFry, Brian
dc.contributor.authorCarter, James F
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-27T02:50:56Z
dc.date.available2020-04-27T02:50:56Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0224297
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/393406
dc.description.abstractThe carbon isotopic compositions of amino acids are increasingly measured to characterize diets and metabolic response to diets. We report a new high-resolution system to measure the stable carbon isotopic composition of carboxyl atoms within amino acids. The automated system used HPLC to separate amino acids followed by addition of ninhydrin for decarboxylation and transfer of the evolved CO2 to a stable isotope ratio mass spectrometer for δ13CCARBOXYL measurement. The ninhydrin reaction was conducted at acidic pH (1.5) and elevated temperature (160 oC) giving yields close to 100% for most common amino acids. Eight mammalian keratin samples from herbivores (kudu and caribou), omnivores (humans) and carnivores (bowhead and humpback zooplanktivorous whales) were analysed with this new system. The data provide an initial calibration of reference materials to be used in studies of this type and is the first report of carboxyl carbon isotope distributions in mammals. Results showed widespread 13C enrichments in both essential and non-essential amino acid carboxyl groups, likely linked to decarboxylation of amino acids during normal metabolism. Analyses of non-essential amino acid isotope profiles showed (1) consistent and general taxon-level metabolic differences between the herbivore, human and whale samples, (2) marked differences among individual humans, ruminants and whales (3) evidence for gluconeogenesis in the wildlife samples, and (4) extensive 13C enrichment likely associated with fasting in the humpback whale sample. Future mammalian research related to the metabolism of growth, reproduction, aging and disease may benefit from using this technique. Values obtained for internationally available samples USGS42 and USGS43 (Tibetan and Indian human hair) provide a first characterization of reference materials for δ13CCARBOXYL profiles.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science (PLoS)
dc.relation.ispartofissue10
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPLoS One
dc.relation.ispartofvolume14
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.titleStable carbon isotope diagnostics of mammalian metabolism, a high-resolution isotomics approach using amino acid carboxyl groups
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationFry, B; Carter, JF, Stable carbon isotope diagnostics of mammalian metabolism, a high-resolution isotomics approach using amino acid carboxyl groups., PLoS One, 2019, 14 (10)
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-10-09
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.date.updated2020-04-27T00:22:48Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Fry, Carter. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorCarter, Jim
gro.griffith.authorFry, Brian D.


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