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dc.contributor.authorGidding, HF
dc.contributor.authorPeng, CQ
dc.contributor.authorGraves, S
dc.contributor.authorMassey, PD
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, C
dc.contributor.authorStenos, J
dc.contributor.authorQuinn, HE
dc.contributor.authorMcIntyre, PB
dc.contributor.authorDurrheim, DN
dc.contributor.authorWood, N
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-19T02:55:19Z
dc.date.available2020-05-19T02:55:19Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn0950-2688
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0950268820000084
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/393987
dc.description.abstractQ fever (caused by Coxiella burnetii) is thought to have an almost world-wide distribution, but few countries have conducted national serosurveys. We measured Q fever seroprevalence using residual sera from diagnostic laboratories across Australia. Individuals aged 1-79 years in 2012-2013 were sampled to be proportional to the population distribution by region, distance from metropolitan areas and gender. A 1/50 serum dilution was tested for the Phase II IgG antibody against C. burnetii by indirect immunofluorescence. We calculated crude seroprevalence estimates by age group and gender, as well as age standardised national and metropolitan/non-metropolitan seroprevalence estimates. Of 2785 sera, 99 tested positive. Age standardised seroprevalence was 5.6% (95% confidence interval (CI 4.5%-6.8%), and similar in metropolitan (5.5%; 95% CI 4.1%-6.9%) and non-metropolitan regions (6.0%; 95%CI 4.0%-8.0%). More males were seropositive (6.9%; 95% CI 5.2%-8.6%) than females (4.2%; 95% CI 2.9%-5.5%) with peak seroprevalence at 50-59 years (9.2%; 95% CI 5.2%-13.3%). Q fever seroprevalence for Australia was higher than expected (especially in metropolitan regions) and higher than estimates from the Netherlands (2.4%; pre-outbreak) and US (3.1%), but lower than for Northern Ireland (12.8%). Robust country-specific seroprevalence estimates, with detailed exposure data, are required to better understand who is at risk and the need for preventive measures.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherCambridge University Press
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrome18:5
dc.relation.ispartofissuee18:1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEpidemiology & Infection
dc.relation.ispartofvolume148
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsPublic, Environmental & Occupational Health
dc.subject.keywordsInfectious Diseases
dc.subject.keywordsAustralia
dc.titleQ fever seroprevalence in Australia suggests one in twenty people have been exposed
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationGidding, HF; Peng, CQ; Graves, S; Massey, PD; Nguyen, C; Stenos, J; Quinn, HE; McIntyre, PB; Durrheim, DN; Wood, N, Q fever seroprevalence in Australia suggests one in twenty people have been exposed, Epidemiology & Infection, 2020, 148, pp. e18:1-e18:5
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.date.updated2020-05-19T02:52:36Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) and The University of Sydney, 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press. This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorStenos, John


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