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dc.contributor.authorStewart, Ian B
dc.contributor.authorMoghadam, Peyman
dc.contributor.authorBorg, David
dc.contributor.authorKung, Terry
dc.contributor.authorSikka, Pavan
dc.contributor.authorMinett, Geoffrey M
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-27T05:57:58Z
dc.date.available2020-05-27T05:57:58Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/394196
dc.description.abstractMuscle damage and soreness associated with increased exercise training loads or unaccustomed activity can be debilitating and impact the quality of subsequent activity/performance. Current techniques to assess muscle soreness are either time consuming, invasive or subjective. Infrared thermography has been identified as a quick, non-invasive, portable and athlete friendly method of assessing skin temperature. This study assessed the capability of thermal infrared imaging to detect skin temperature changes that may accompany the inflammatory response associated with delayed onset muscular soreness (DOMS). Eight recreationally trained participants (age 25 ± 3 years, mass 74.9 ± 13.6 kg, training minutes 296 ± 175 min·wk-1) completed 6 sets of 25 maximal concentric/eccentric contractions of the right knee flexors/extensors on a dynamometer to induce muscle damage and DOMS. The left knee extensors acted as a non-exercise control. Neuromuscular performance, subjective pain assessment and infrared thermography were undertaken at baseline, 24 and 48 hr post the DOMS-inducing exercise protocol. Data were analysed using Bayesian hierarchical regression and Cohen’s d was also calculated. Maximal voluntary contraction torque was statistically lower at 24 hr (d = -0.70) and 48 hr (d = -0.52) compared to baseline, after the DOMS-inducing exercise protocol. These neuromuscular impairments coincided with statistically higher ratings of muscle soreness at 24 hr (d = 0.96) and 48 hr (d = 0.48). After adjusting for ambient temperature, anterior thigh skin temperature was statistically elevated at 24 hr, but not 48 hr, compared with baseline, in both the exercised and non-exercised leg. Thigh temperature was not different statistically between legs at these time points. Infrared imaging was able to detect elevations in skin temperature, at 24 hrs after the DOMS inducing exercise protocol, in both the exercised and non-exercised thigh. Elevations in the skin temperature of both thighs, potentially identifies a systemic inflammatory response occurring at 24 hr after the DOMS-inducing exercise protocol.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherJournal of Sports Science and Medicine
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom469
dc.relation.ispartofpageto477
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Sports Science and Medicine
dc.relation.ispartofvolume19
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSports Medicine
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMechanical Engineering
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHuman Movement and Sports Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110604
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0913
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1106
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.keywordsThermal Physiology
dc.titleThermal Infrared Imaging Can Differentiate Skin Temperature Changes Associated With Intense Single Leg Exercise, But Not With Delayed Onset of Muscle Soreness
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationStewart, IB; Moghadam, P; Borg, D; Kung, T; Sikka, P; Minett, GM, Thermal Infrared Imaging Can Differentiate Skin Temperature Changes Associated With Intense Single Leg Exercise, But Not With Delayed Onset of Muscle Soreness, Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 2020, 19, pp. 469-477
dc.date.updated2020-05-25T00:51:55Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2020 JSSM. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBorg, David


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