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dc.contributor.authorShaaban, Muhammad
dc.contributor.authorPeng, Qi-an
dc.contributor.authorBashir, Saqib
dc.contributor.authorWu, Yupeng
dc.contributor.authorYounas, Aneela
dc.contributor.authorXu, Xiangyu
dc.contributor.authorRashti, Mehran Razaei
dc.contributor.authorAbid, Muhammad
dc.contributor.authorZafar-ul-Hye, Muhammad
dc.contributor.authorNunez-Delgado, Avelino
dc.contributor.authorHorwath, William R
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Yanbin
dc.contributor.authorLin, Shan
dc.contributor.authorHu, Ronggui
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-29T04:36:16Z
dc.date.available2020-05-29T04:36:16Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn0301-4797
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jenvman.2019.109535
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/394225
dc.description.abstractHeavy metals are believed to impact soil processes by influencing microbial communities, nutrient cycling or exchanging for essential plant nutrients. Soil pH adjustment highly influences the bio-availability of nutrients and microbial processes. We examined the effect of soil pH manipulation and copper (Cu as CuCl2.2H2O) application on nitrogen (N) cycling and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from an acid soil. Increasing amounts of Cu (0, 250, 500 and 1000 mg kg−1) were added to an acidic soil (pH = 5.44) that was further amended with increasing amounts of dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2] to increase soil pH. Dolomite increased soil pH values, which reached a maximum without Cu application (-Cu) at day 42 of the experiment. The soil pH values decreased with increasing dose of Cu, and remained low as compared with both control and dolomite amended soil. Ammonium (NH4+-N) concentrations were higher in Cu contaminated soil as compared with the control and dolomite treated soil. Nitrate (NO3−-N) concentrations increased in dolomite treated soil when compared with the +Cu alone treatments and control. Microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN) contents were higher in dolomite treated soil as compared with the +Cu treatments and control. The application of increasing amounts of Cu progressively decreased soil MBC and MBN. Nitrous oxide emissions were higher (p ≤ 0.01) in +Cu soil as compared with the control, and increased with increasing Cu concentration in soil. Application of dolomite highly suppressed soil N2O emissions in both +Cu and –Cu soils. The results indicate that the effects of heavy metal contamination (specifically Cu contamination) can increase N2O emissions, but this can be effectively mitigated through increasing soil pH, also decreasing potential toxic effects on soil microorganisms.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Environmental Management
dc.relation.ispartofvolume250
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode41
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsEnvironmental Sciences & Ecology
dc.subject.keywordsSoil restoration
dc.titleRestoring effect of soil acidity and Cu on N2O emissions from an acidic soil
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationShaaban, M; Peng, Q-A; Bashir, S; Wu, Y; Younas, A; Xu, X; Rashti, MR; Abid, M; Zafar-ul-Hye, M; Nunez-Delgado, A; Horwath, WR; Jiang, Y; Lin, S; Hu, R, Restoring effect of soil acidity and Cu on N2O emissions from an acidic soil, Journal of Environmental Management, 2019, 250
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-09-03
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.date.updated2020-05-29T01:00:17Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence, which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorRezaei Rashti, Mehran


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