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dc.contributor.authorAbu-Ghazaleh, Nadine
dc.contributor.authorChua, Weng Joe
dc.contributor.authorGopalan, Vinod
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-05T03:43:27Z
dc.date.available2020-06-05T03:43:27Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn0815-9319
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jgh.15042
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/394269
dc.description.abstractThe human colon harbors a high number of microorganisms that were reported to play a crucial role in colorectal carcinogenesis. In the recent decade, molecular detection and metabolomic techniques have expanded our knowledge on the role of specific microbial species in promoting tumorigenesis. In this study, we reviewed the association between microbial dysbiosis and colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Various microbial species and their association with colorectal tumorigenesis and red/processed meat consumption have been reviewed. The literature demonstrated a significant abundance of Fusobacterium nucleatum , Streptococcus bovis /gallolyticus , Escherichia coli , and Bacteroides fragilis in patients with adenoma or adenocarcinoma compared to healthy individuals. The mechanisms in which each organism was postulated to promote colon carcinogenesis were collated and summarized in this review. These include the microorganisms' ability to adhere to colon cells; modulate the inhibition of tumor suppressor genes, the activations of oncogenes, and genotoxicity; and activate downstream targets responsible for angiogenesis. The role of these microorganisms in conjugation with meat components including N‐nitroso compounds, heterocyclic amines, and heme was also evident in multiple studies. The outcome of this review supports the role of red meat consumption in modulating CRC progression and the possibility of gut microbiome influencing the relationship between CRC and diet. The study also demonstrates that microbiota analysis could potentially complement existing screening methods when detecting colonic lesions.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsGastroenterology & Hepatology
dc.subject.keywordsBacteroides fragilis
dc.subject.keywordsbile acids
dc.titleIntestinal microbiota and its association with colon cancer and red/processed meat consumption
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationAbu-Ghazaleh, N; Chua, WJ; Gopalan, V, Intestinal microbiota and its association with colon cancer and red/processed meat consumption, Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 2020
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-03-18
dc.date.updated2020-06-01T00:10:35Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.description.notepublicThis publication was entered as an advanced online version.
gro.rights.copyright© 2020 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Intestinal microbiota and its association with colon cancer and red/processed meat consumption, Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 2020, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/jgh.15042. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html)
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorGopalan, Vinod


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