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dc.contributor.authorTzoumakis, Stacy
dc.contributor.authorWhitten, Tyson
dc.contributor.authorPiotrowska, Patrycja
dc.contributor.authorDean, Kimberlie
dc.contributor.authorLaurens, Kristin R
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Felicity
dc.contributor.authorCarr, Vaughan J
dc.contributor.authorGreen, Melissa J
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-04T23:04:33Z
dc.date.available2020-06-04T23:04:33Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn0047-2352
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jcrimjus.2020.101670
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/394370
dc.description.abstractThe link between parental and offspring offending has been well established from some of the earliest longitudinal criminological studies (Glueck & Glueck, 1950). The relationship has been particularly demonstrated for fathers and their offspring (Hjalmarsson & Lindquist, 2012; Rowe & Farrington, 1997; Thornberry, 2009), in part because many of the major cohort studies included only males. Moreover, because the base rate of offending is lower for females, even fewer studies have been able to reliably examine offending and antisocial behavior between mothers and daughters. It is important to determine the nature of the association for females, considering that there are gender differences in the development of antisocial behavior and its associated risk factors (Broidy et al., 2015; Herrera & Stuewig, 2017; Moffitt, Caspi, Rutter, & Silva, 2001). There is also evidence that the needs and profiles of females involved in delinquency and offending are different to that of males and as a result, prevention and rehabilitation programs should be gender-responsive (i.e., developed based on the unique needs of girls) to be effective (Lanctôt, 2018; Matthews & Hubbard, 2008; Wright, Van Voorhis, Salisbury, & Bauman, 2012). Most of the work on the role of gender in prevention programs has focused on adolescence or adulthood, ignoring the earlier developmental periods. One recent study has shown that a childhood (under age 12 years) gender-specific risk assessment tool is effective at predicting offending up to age 21 years (Koegl, Farrington, & Augimeri, 2019). In addition, a review of 50 systematic reviews on developmental prevention programs for individuals, families, and schools concluded that these programs were effective with varying effect sizes (Farrington, Gaffney, Lösel, & Ttofi, 2017). Considering that those individuals who have conduct problems and difficulty regulating their behavior in childhood are more likely to continue offending over the life course (DeLisi & Vaughn, 2014; Moffitt et al., 2001), it would be important from a policy perspective to invest in these early intervention programs. Little research has examined whether females have different needs compared to males in childhood and how this might influence the development of these early intervention programs. This study will investigate the gender differences in the intergenerational transmission of antisocial behavior across three different developmental periods (i.e., early childhood, middle childhood, and early adolescence), which could potentially be targeted for the development of family preventative intervention programs.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom101670:1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto101670:8
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Criminal Justice
dc.relation.ispartofvolume67
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1602
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciences
dc.subject.keywordsCriminology & Penology
dc.subject.keywordsMATERNAL DELINQUENCY
dc.subject.keywordsDIFFICULTIES
dc.subject.keywordsCHILDHOOD
dc.titleGender and the intergenerational transmission of antisocial behavior
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationTzoumakis, S; Whitten, T; Piotrowska, P; Dean, K; Laurens, KR; Harris, F; Carr, VJ; Green, MJ, Gender and the intergenerational transmission of antisocial behavior, Journal of Criminal Justice, 2020, 67, pp. 101670:1- 101670:8
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.date.updated2020-06-03T23:21:57Z
dc.description.versionPost-print
gro.rights.copyright© 2020 Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorTzoumakis, Stacy


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