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dc.contributor.authorHager, Gail
dc.contributor.authorKitson, Lisbeth
dc.contributor.authorGrootenboer, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-04T00:57:11Z
dc.date.available2020-06-04T00:57:11Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1038-1562
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/394385
dc.description.abstractOver the last two decades, changes in educational policies have led to increased teacher accountability and the advent of high stakes testing. In Australia, concern has been expressed over the results from international and national tests such as NAEP and NAPLAN Key stakeholders in education have therefore, explored ways to improve learner results. One way to improve results might be through improving writing teaching practices. There is a plethora of research available providing models and strategies to improve writing teaching practices. One strategy is to teach 'writing for learning' practices. However, questions remain over whether teachers are enacting these models and strategies in their writing teaching practices, and what might be impacting the inclusion of these writing teaching practices at the local site level. This article describes one writing teaching practice of a middle school teacher at an independent school in Queensland, Australia. The theory of practice architectures was employed to interrogate the enabling and constraining conditions that were evident as this teacher went about teaching writing practices in a Year 9 elective subject, Business Studies. The research found that whilst the teacher taught aspects of 'writing for learning' practices, the practices and practice architectures at the site formed a complex nest of interrelationships that impacted each other. In this article, we argue that, in order to change practice, it is necessary to change the conditions that both enable and constrain the teaching of writing practices.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherAustralian Literacy Educators' Association
dc.publisher.urihttps://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=664177965315125;res=IELAPA
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom195
dc.relation.ispartofpageto205
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Journal of Language and Literacy (AJLL)
dc.relation.ispartofvolume42
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCurriculum and Pedagogy
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation Systems
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSpecialist Studies in Education
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1302
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1301
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1303
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciences
dc.subject.keywordsEducation & Educational Research
dc.subject.keywordsTEACHING DISCIPLINARY LITERACY
dc.subject.keywordsKNOWLEDGE
dc.subject.keywordsLANGUAGE
dc.titleThe business of writing to learn in business: Examining writing practices through the lens of practice architectures
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationHager, G; Kitson, L; Grootenboer, P, The business of writing to learn in business: Examining writing practices through the lens of practice architectures, Australian Journal of Language and Literacy (AJLL), 2019, 42 (3), pp. 195-205
dc.date.updated2020-06-03T23:16:36Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Australian Literacy Educators' Association. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorGrootenboer, Peter J.
gro.griffith.authorHager, Gail A.
gro.griffith.authorKitson, Lisbeth A.


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