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dc.contributor.authorLicari, MK
dc.contributor.authorAlvares, GA
dc.contributor.authorVarcin, K
dc.contributor.authorEvans, KL
dc.contributor.authorCleary, D
dc.contributor.authorReid, SL
dc.contributor.authorGlasson, EJ
dc.contributor.authorBebbington, K
dc.contributor.authorReynolds, JE
dc.contributor.authorWray, J
dc.contributor.authorWhitehouse, AJO
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-12T02:54:32Z
dc.date.available2020-06-12T02:54:32Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn1939-3792
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/aur.2230
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/394575
dc.description.abstractMotor impairment is not currently included in the diagnostic criteria or evaluation of autism. This reflects the lack of large‐scale studies demonstrating its prominence to advocate for change. We examined the prevalence of motor difficulties at the time of diagnosis in a large sample of children with autism utilizing standardized assessment, and the relationship between motor difficulties, core autism symptomology, and other prominent clinical features. Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales were administered to children from the Western Australian Register for Autism Spectrum Disorders aged ≤6 years (N = 2,084; 81.2% males, 18.8% females). Prevalence of motor difficulties was quantified based on scores from the motor domain of the Vineland and then compared to other domains of functioning within the Vineland (communication, daily living, and socialization), the DSM criteria, intellectual level, age, and gender. Scores on the Vineland indicated that 35.4% of the sample met criteria for motor difficulties (standard score <70), a rate almost as common as intellectual impairment (37.7%). Motor difficulties were reported by diagnosing clinicians in only 1.34% of cases. Motor difficulties were common in those cases meeting diagnostic criteria for impairments in nonverbal behavior and the presence of restricted and repetitive behaviors. The prevalence of motor difficulties also increased with increasing age of diagnosis (P < 0.001). Findings from the present study highlight the need for further consideration of motor difficulties as a distinct specifier within the diagnostic criteria for ASD.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom298
dc.relation.ispartofpageto306
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAutism Research
dc.relation.ispartofvolume13
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNeurosciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1109
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.keywordsautism spectrum disorder
dc.subject.keywordsdevelopmental disabilities
dc.subject.keywordsmotor disorders
dc.subject.keywordsmotor skills
dc.subject.keywordsmovement
dc.titlePrevalence of Motor Difficulties in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Analysis of a Population-Based Cohort
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationLicari, MK; Alvares, GA; Varcin, K; Evans, KL; Cleary, D; Reid, SL; Glasson, EJ; Bebbington, K; Reynolds, JE; Wray, J; Whitehouse, AJO, Prevalence of Motor Difficulties in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Analysis of a Population-Based Cohort, Autism Research, 2020, 13 (2), pp. 298-306
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-09-26
dc.date.updated2020-06-12T02:53:30Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorVarcin, Kandice J.


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