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dc.contributor.authorCanosa, Antonia
dc.contributor.authorBennett, Andy
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-23T03:48:00Z
dc.date.available2020-06-23T03:48:00Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn1367-6261
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13676261.2020.1730772
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/394805
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this article is to consider the politico-cultural significance of the Australian ‘bush-doof’ for contemporary youth. The bush-doof is a localised form of Electronic Dance Music (EDM) party held in a bushland setting. It is argued that the bush doof provides a space for young people to reject forms of commoditised and over-regulated night-time leisure associated with (semi)urban environments. Associated with this is an expression of a shared ecological consciousness that finds its primary form of articulation in the rural setting of the bush doof event. In framing the experience of young doof party goers, Maffesoli’s concept of neo-tribe is used as a means of situating doof parties as opportunities for temporal bonding and sociality. Although neo-tribe has previously been used in studies of EDM, such work has often focused on urban settings. In this article, however, we argue that neo-tribal theory can also be effective as a means of understanding the experience of EDM in regional and rural settings. More specifically, we demonstrate how in its rural manifestation of the doof party, EDM also functions as an important marker of identity and fosters young people’s need for belonging and communitas.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherRoutledge Journals, Taylor & Francis
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Youth Studies
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSociology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSpecialist Studies in Education
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1608
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1303
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciences
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciences, Interdisciplinary
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciences - Other Topics
dc.subject.keywordsBush doof
dc.subject.keywordsrave
dc.titleUrban vibes in a rural setting: a study of the bush doof scene in Byron Shire
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationCanosa, A; Bennett, A, Urban vibes in a rural setting: a study of the bush doof scene in Byron Shire, Journal of Youth Studies, 2020
dc.date.updated2020-06-23T03:38:19Z
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorBennett, Andy A.


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