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dc.contributor.authorOwnsworth, Tamara
dc.contributor.authorTheodoros, Deborah
dc.contributor.authorCahill, Louise
dc.contributor.authorVaezipour, Atiyeh
dc.contributor.authorQuinn, Ray
dc.contributor.authorKendall, Melissa
dc.contributor.authorMoyle, Wendy
dc.contributor.authorLucas, Karen
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-26T04:29:08Z
dc.date.available2020-06-26T04:29:08Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn1355-6177
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S135561771900078X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/394927
dc.description.abstractObjectives: There is limited research on the use of telerehabilitation platforms in service delivery for people with acquired brain injury (ABI), especially technologies that support delivery of services into the home. This qualitative study aimed to explore the perspectives of rehabilitation coordinators, individuals with ABI, and family caregivers on the usability and acceptability of videoconferencing (VC) in community-based rehabilitation. Participants' experiences and perceptions of telerehabilitation and their impressions of a particular VC system were investigated.Methods: Guided by a theory on technology acceptance, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 30 participants from a community-based ABI service, including 13 multidisciplinary rehabilitation coordinators, 9 individuals with ABI, and 8 family caregivers. During the interview, they were shown a paper prototype of a telehealth portal for VC that was available for use. Interview transcripts were coded by two researchers and analysed thematically.Results: The VC was used on average for 2% of client consultations. Four major themes depicted factors influencing the uptake of VC platforms; namely, the context or impetus for use, perceived benefits, potential problems and parameters around use, and balancing the service and user needs. Participants identified beneficial uses of VC in service delivery and strategies for promoting a positive user experience.Conclusions: Perceptions of the usability of VC to provide services in the home were largely positive; however, consideration of use on a case-by-case basis and a trial implementation was recommended to enhance successful uptake into service delivery.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherCambridge University Press
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom47
dc.relation.ispartofpageto57
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society
dc.relation.ispartofvolume26
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology and Cognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode17
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciences
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsClinical Neurology
dc.subject.keywordsNeurosciences
dc.titlePerceived Usability and Acceptability of Videoconferencing for Delivering Community-Based Rehabilitation to Individuals with Acquired Brain Injury: A Qualitative Investigation
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationOwnsworth, T; Theodoros, D; Cahill, L; Vaezipour, A; Quinn, R; Kendall, M; Moyle, W; Lucas, K, Perceived Usability and Acceptability of Videoconferencing for Delivering Community-Based Rehabilitation to Individuals with Acquired Brain Injury: A Qualitative Investigation, Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 2020, 26 (1), pp. 47-57
dc.date.updated2020-06-26T00:40:43Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2020 International Neuropsychological Society. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorOwnsworth, Tamara
gro.griffith.authorMoyle, Wendy
gro.griffith.authorKendall, Melissa B.


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