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dc.contributor.authorHussain, Mir Zaman
dc.contributor.authorBhardwaj, Ajay K
dc.contributor.authorBasso, Bruno
dc.contributor.authorRobertson, G Philip
dc.contributor.authorHamilton, Stephen K
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-07T03:04:09Z
dc.date.available2020-07-07T03:04:09Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn0047-2425
dc.identifier.doi10.2134/jeq2019.04.0156
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/395223
dc.description.abstractLeaching from annual corn (Zea mays L.) crops is a primary source of nitrate (NO3−) pollution of ground and surface waters. Here, we compare NO3− losses from no‐till corn with losses from various alternative perennial cropping systems (switchgrass [Panicum virgatum L.], miscanthus [Miscanthus ×giganteus J.M. Greef & Deuter ex Hodkinson & Renvoiz], a native grass mixture, and restored prairie), as well as hybrid poplar (Populus nigra L. × P. maximowiczii A. Henry ‘NM6’), all grown on a well‐drained soil in Michigan. Soil water was sampled from below the root zone using suction cup samplers during nonfrozen periods (March–November) between 2009 and 2016. Leaching was estimated from NO3− concentrations in soil water and modeled drainage (percolation) rates. Drainage rates were not significantly different among crops, constituting ∼30% of total annual precipitation. Aboveground net primary production (Mg ha−1 yr−1) averaged across the 7 yr was highest in poplar (30.8 ± 1.9 [SE]) followed by miscanthus (23.9 ± 2.4) and corn (20.4 ± 0.9). Volume‐weighted mean NO3− concentrations (mg N L−1) and NO3− leaching (kg ha−1 yr−1) averaged across the 7 yr were 9.2 and 34.1, 2.3 and 5.9, and 3.0 and 7.2, respectively, for corn, perennial grasses and poplar. Approximately 10 to 32% of applied N was lost as NO3− from these crops, with the highest percent losses from poplar (32%) followed by corn (20%). Perennial cropping systems leached considerably more NO3− in first few years after planting, but over 7 yr they lost much less NO3− than corn. Perennial crops may therefore help ameliorate NO3− pollution in agricultural landscapes even if they receive modest N fertilization.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Agronomy
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1849
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1855
dc.relation.ispartofissue6
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Environmental Quality
dc.relation.ispartofvolume48
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEarth Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode04
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode05
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode06
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsEnvironmental Sciences & Ecology
dc.subject.keywordsBIOENERGY CROPPING SYSTEMS
dc.titleNitrate Leaching from Continuous Corn, Perennial Grasses, and Poplar in the US Midwest
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationHussain, MZ; Bhardwaj, AK; Basso, B; Robertson, GP; Hamilton, SK, Nitrate Leaching from Continuous Corn, Perennial Grasses, and Poplar in the US Midwest, Journal of Environmental QualityY, 2019, 48 (6), pp. 1849-1855
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.date.updated2020-07-07T02:59:58Z
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 The Authors. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) License, which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHamilton, Stephen K.


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