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dc.contributor.authorWeinman, Aaron L
dc.contributor.authorSullivan, Sheena G
dc.contributor.authorVijaykrishna, Dhanasekaran
dc.contributor.authorMarkey, Peter
dc.contributor.authorLevy, Avram
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Adrian
dc.contributor.authorTong, Steven YC
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-31T06:26:24Z
dc.date.available2020-07-31T06:26:24Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn1750-2640en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/irv.12757en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/396036
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The Northern Territory (NT) of Australia has a mix of climates, sparsely distributed population and a large proportion of the populace are Indigenous Australians, and influenza is known to have a disproportionate impact upon this group. Understanding the epidemiology of influenza in this region would inform public health strategies. OBJECTIVES: To assess if there are consistent patterns in characteristics of influenza outbreaks in the NT. METHODS: Laboratory confirmed influenza cases in the NT are notified to the NT Centre for Disease Control. We conducted analyses on notified cases from 2007-2016 to determine incidence rates (by age group, Indigenous status and area), seasonality of cases and spatial distribution of influenza types. Notified cases were linked to laboratory datasets to update information on influenza type or subtype RESULTS: The disparity in Indigenous and non-Indigenous notification rates varied by age group, with rate ratios for Indigenous versus non-Indigenous ranging from 1.58 (95% CI:1.39, 1.80) for ages 15-24 to 5.56 (95% CI: 4.71, 6.57) for ages 55-64. The disparity between Indigenous and non-Indigenous notification rates appeared higher in the Central Australia region. Indigenous versus non-Indigenous hospitalisation and mortality rate ratios were 6.51 (95% CI: 5.91, 7.18) and 5.46 (95% CI: 2.40, 12.71) respectively. Inter-seasonal peaks during February and March occurred in 2011, 2013 and 2014, and were due to influenza activity in the tropical north of the NT. CONCLUSIONS: Our results highlight the importance of influenza vaccination across all age groups for Indigenous Australians. An early vaccination campaign targeted against outbreaks in February-March would be best focused on the tropical north.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInfluenza and Other Respiratory Virusesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Servicesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117en_US
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicineen_US
dc.subject.keywordsInfectious Diseasesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsVirologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsepidemicsen_US
dc.titleEpidemiological trends in notified influenza cases in Australia's Northern Territory, 2007-2016en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationWeinman, AL; Sullivan, SG; Vijaykrishna, D; Markey, P; Levy, A; Miller, A; Tong, SYC, Epidemiological trends in notified influenza cases in Australia's Northern Territory, 2007-2016, Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses, 2020en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-04-23
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.date.updated2020-07-31T04:03:47Z
dc.description.versionPublisheden_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2020 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorMiller, Adrian


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