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dc.contributor.authorSheeran, Nicola
dc.contributor.authorJones, Liz
dc.contributor.authorBernardin, Stacey
dc.contributor.authorWood, Martin
dc.contributor.authorDoherty, Leisa
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-03T04:33:05Z
dc.date.available2020-08-03T04:33:05Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn0360-0025
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11199-020-01172-8
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/396085
dc.description.abstractConstructions of teenage fathers largely portray them as absent, criminal, and violent (Johansson and Hammarén 2014; Kiselica and Kiselica 2014), with their identity tied to the role of breadwinner rather than parent. Although teenage fathers report being judged and belittled, little is known about societally held stereotypes toward teenage fathers. With samples of participants in Australia, we conducted three studies, based on the Stereotype Content Model, to explore societal stereotypes, and attitudes more broadly, of teenage fathers, including factors that may influence attitudes. Study 1 (n = 177) investigated attitudes toward teenage fathers, compared to teenage mothers and adult parents, demonstrating they were perceived least favorably. Study 2 (n = 94) explored whether the attitudes and stereotypes of teenage fathers held by university students were similar or different to those of men who are low SES and male adolescents. We found that, similar to male adolescents in general, teenage fathers were seen as lacking maturity and that, similar to men who are low SES, stereotypes were contemptuous. We did not find expected differences in perceived morality. Finally, Study 3 (n = 462) explored whether attitudes toward teenage fathers were less negative if they were perceived to be employed. They were not. Overall, our findings suggested teenage fathers are perceived to lack maturity, morality, competence, warmth, and capacity to parent. Whether they were employed or not made little difference to people’s perceptions. Our findings suggest that stereotypes of teenage fathers are largely contemptuous, which can be internalized by teenage fathers and may reduce their help-seeking.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.relation.ispartofjournalSex Roles
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchOther Studies in Human Society
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1699
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciences
dc.subject.keywordsPsychology, Developmental
dc.subject.keywordsPsychology, Social
dc.subject.keywordsWomen's Studies
dc.titleImmoral, Incompetent, and Lacking Warmth: How Stereotypes of Teenage Fathers Compare to Those of Other Parents
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationSheeran, N; Jones, L; Bernardin, S; Wood, M; Doherty, L, Immoral, Incompetent, and Lacking Warmth: How Stereotypes of Teenage Fathers Compare to Those of Other Parents, Sex Roles, 2020
dc.date.updated2020-08-03T04:27:04Z
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered in Griffith Research Online as an advanced online version.
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorSheeran, Nicola J.
gro.griffith.authorJones, Liz S.
gro.griffith.authorBernardin, Stacey K.


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