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dc.contributor.authorGrömping, M
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-07T00:31:47Z
dc.date.available2020-08-07T00:31:47Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1058-4609
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10584609.2018.1551256
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/396286
dc.description.abstractStudies investigating the agenda-setting of human rights groups disagree on both their prospects of garnering political attention, and the factors that help them in that quest. This study makes the argument that we need to take account of both macro-institutional opportunity structures and actor-level strategies in order to gain a more complete understanding of the group-media interface. Specifically, it posits that the urgency of social problems only drives media attention toward groups if a country’s media landscape is sufficiently free, and that within these institutional constraints, groups themselves can enhance their media access by providing newsmakers with information subsidies. These claims are substantiated by way of a novel cross-nationally comparative data set of more than 1,000 domestic election monitoring and advocacy organizations. Findings show that media attention is structurally limited by the degree to which the news media serve as an open arena, and that even in countries with a free press, few groups achieve media access. At the same time, the most successful groups are not necessarily the most resourceful ones. Rather, strategic choices to invest in media effort, narrow policy engagement, and professionalization substitute for scarce resources, thereby giving groups “more bang for their buck.” The results clarify the causal mechanisms behind the dominance of resource-rich groups on the media agenda and reinforce calls for more globally comparative research into media agenda-setting.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom452
dc.relation.ispartofpageto475
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPolitical Communication
dc.relation.ispartofvolume36
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolitical science
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCommunication and media studies
dc.subject.fieldofresearchComparative government and politics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4408
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode440803
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciences
dc.subject.keywordsCommunication
dc.subject.keywordsGovernment & Law
dc.subject.keywordsagenda-setting
dc.titleMore Bang for the Buck: Media Freedom and Organizational Strategies in the Agenda-Setting of Human Rights Groups
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationGrömping, M, More Bang for the Buck: Media Freedom and Organizational Strategies in the Agenda-Setting of Human Rights Groups, Political Communication, 2019, 36 (3), pp. 452-475
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.date.updated2020-08-07T00:29:13Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 The Author(s). Published with license by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License, which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and is not altered, transformed, or built upon in any way.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorGroemping, Max


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