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dc.contributor.authorFarrell, G
dc.contributor.authorBirks, D
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-17T05:13:59Z
dc.date.available2020-08-17T05:13:59Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn2193-7680
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s40163-020-00113-w
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/396506
dc.description.abstractWe recently rejected the hypothesis that increases in cybercrime may have caused the international crime drop. Critics subsequently argued that offenders switched from physical crime to cybercrime in recent years, and that lifestyle changes due to ‘leisure IT’ may have caused the international crime drop. Here we explain how the critics misrepresented our argument and do not appear to introduce anything new.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom4
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalCrime Science
dc.relation.ispartofvolume9
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4402
dc.titleFurther rejection of the cybercrime hypothesis
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationFarrell, G; Birks, D, Further rejection of the cybercrime hypothesis, Crime Science, 2020, 9 (1), pp. 4
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.date.updated2020-08-17T05:09:26Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2020. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativeco mmons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/ zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBirks, Daniel J.


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