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dc.contributor.authorPeters, Michael A
dc.contributor.authorRizvi, Fazal
dc.contributor.authorMcCulloch, Gary
dc.contributor.authorGibbs, Paul
dc.contributor.authorGorur, Radhika
dc.contributor.authorHong, Moon
dc.contributor.authorHwang, Yoonjung
dc.contributor.authorZipin, Lew
dc.contributor.authorBrennan, Marie
dc.contributor.authorRobertson, Susan
dc.contributor.authorQuay, John
dc.contributor.authorMalbon, Justin
dc.contributor.authorTaglietti, Danilo
dc.contributor.authorBarnett, Ronald
dc.contributor.authoret al.
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-19T03:23:42Z
dc.date.available2020-08-19T03:23:42Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn0013-1857
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00131857.2020.1777655
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/396551
dc.description.abstractOur minds are still racing back and forth, longing for a return to ‘normality’, trying to stitch our future to our past and refusing to acknowledge the rupture. But the rupture exists. And in the midst of this terrible despair, it offers us a chance to rethink the doomsday machine we have built for ourselves. Nothing could be worse than a return to normality. Historically, pandemics have forced humans to break with the past and imagine their world anew. This one is no different. It is a portal, a gateway between one world and the next. We can choose to walk through it, dragging the carcasses of our prejudice and hatred, our avarice, our data banks and dead ideas, our dead rivers and smoky skies behind us. Or we can walk through lightly, with little luggage, ready to imagine another world. And ready to fight for it.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.sponsorshipReely Good Productions Pty Ltd
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Group
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom45 pages
dc.relation.ispartofpageto45 pages
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEducational Philosophy and Theory
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSpecialist Studies in Education
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHistory and Philosophy of Specific Fields
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1303
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1702
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2202
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciences
dc.subject.keywordsEducation & Educational Research
dc.subject.keywordsPHILOSOPHY
dc.titleReimagining the new pedagogical possibilities for universities post-Covid-19: An EPAT Collective Project
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationPeters, MA; Rizvi, F; McCulloch, G; Gibbs, P; Gorur, R; Hong, M; Hwang, Y; Zipin, L; Brennan, M; Robertson, S; Quay, J; Malbon, J; Taglietti, D; Barnett, R; Cet al., Reimagining the new pedagogical possibilities for universities post-Covid-19 An EPAT Collective Project, Educational Philosophy and Theory, 2020
dc.date.updated2020-08-19T00:46:54Z
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered in Griffith Research Online as an advanced online version.
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorMalbon, Justin E.


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