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dc.contributor.authorSiyambalapitiya, Samantha
dc.contributor.authorCornwell, Petrea
dc.contributor.authorDavidson, Bronwyn
dc.contributor.authorHowe, Tami
dc.contributor.authorKalapac, Naomi
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-27T00:28:01Z
dc.date.available2020-08-27T00:28:01Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn1747-4930
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1747493018778666
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/396811
dc.description.abstractBackground: Australia is one of the most multicultural societies globally, with Census data indicating 26% of the population were born overseas. Stroke care professionals increasingly need to provide care to people from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds. Cultural difference and language discordance create challenges in providing optimal stroke care to CALD patients. This multiphase case study explored multidisciplinary practice in the provision of acute transitional care to CALD stroke survivors at one hospital. Phase 1 was an audit of medical records of CALD stroke patients. Aims: The aims of the chart audit were: (i) to determine the proportion of the stroke caseload that are CALD; (ii) to identify terminology used to refer to CALD stroke patients and information regarding language and cultural background; (iii) to explore clinical pathways of CALD stroke survivors. Methods: A retrospective review was conducted of medical records of CALD patients, admitted with a diagnosis of stroke, over a 12-month period. Results: Of the 250 stroke admissions, 34% (n¼85) were CALD, including four Aboriginal patients. CALD patients originated from 34 different countries of birth and spoke 19 languages other than English. Interpreter usage was reported for only 15 patients, with untrained family and staff often interpreting health information. In some instances, the usual care pathway was not provided due to communication barriers. Discussion: The chart audit revealed the diversity of cultural and linguistic backgrounds that must be accommodated in providing acute transition care to CALD stroke patients; and highlighted how language discordance may compromise health care.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Stroke Foundation
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameStroke 2018 Conference
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleInternational Journal of Stroke
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2018-08-07
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2018-08-10
dc.relation.ispartoflocationSydney, Australia
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom8
dc.relation.ispartofpageto8
dc.relation.ispartofissue1_suppl
dc.relation.ispartofvolume13
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNeurosciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1109
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsClinical Neurology
dc.subject.keywordsPeripheral Vascular Disease
dc.subject.keywordsNeurology
dc.titleAcute transitional care for culturally and linguistically diverse stroke survivors: Findings from a 12-month chart audit
dc.typeConference output
dc.type.descriptionE3 - Conferences (Extract Paper)
dcterms.bibliographicCitationSiyambalapitiya, S; Cornwell, P; Davidson, B; Howe, T; Kalapac, N, Acute transitional care for culturally and linguistically diverse stroke survivors: Findings from a 12-month chart audit, International Journal of Stroke, 2018, 13 (1_suppl), pp. 8-8
dc.date.updated2020-08-27T00:17:26Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorSiyambalapitiya, Samantha
gro.griffith.authorCornwell, Petrea


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