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dc.contributor.authorSherwin, Justin C
dc.contributor.authorKearns, Lisa S
dc.contributor.authorHewitt, Alex W
dc.contributor.authorMa, Yaling
dc.contributor.authorKelly, John
dc.contributor.authorGriffiths, Lyn R
dc.contributor.authorMackey, David A
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-12T01:30:35Z
dc.date.available2018-12-12T01:30:35Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.date.modified2011-08-03T06:52:21Z
dc.identifier.issn0928-6586
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/09286586.2010.545933
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/39701
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Over 40% of the permanent population of Norfolk Island possesses a unique genetic admixture dating to Pitcairn Island in the late 18th century, with descendents having varying degrees of combined Polynesian and European ancestry. We conducted a population-based study to determine the prevalence and causes of blindness and low vision on Norfolk Island. Methods: All permanent residents of Norfolk Island aged = 15 years were invited to participate. Participants completed a structured questionnaire/interview and underwent a comprehensive ophthalmic examination including slit-lamp biomicroscopy. Results: We recruited 781 people aged = 15, equal to 62% of the permanent population, 44% of whom could trace their ancestry to Pitcairn Island. No one was bilaterally blind. Prevalence of unilateral blindness (visual acuity [VA] < 6/60) in those aged = 40 was 1.5%. Blindness was more common in females (P = 0.049) and less common in people with Pitcairn Island ancestry (P < 0.001). The most common causes of unilateral blindness were age-related macular degeneration (AMD), amblyopia, and glaucoma. Five people had low vision (Best-Corrected VA < 6/18 in better eye), with 4 (80%) due to AMD. People with Pitcairn Island ancestry had a lower prevalence of AMD (P < 0.001) but a similar prevalence of glaucoma to those without Pitcairn Island ancestry. Conclusions: The prevalence of blindness and visual impairment in this isolated Australian territory is low, especially amongst those with Pitcairn Island ancestry. AMD was the most common cause of unilateral blindness and low vision. The distribution of chronic ocular diseases on Norfolk Island is similar to mainland Australian estimates.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherInforma Healthcare
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom61
dc.relation.ispartofpageto71
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalOphthalmic Epidemiology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume18
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchOphthalmology and Optometry not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchOpthalmology and Optometry
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111399
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode119999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1113
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.titlePrevalence of Chronic Ocular Diseases in a Genetic Isolate: The Norfolk Island Eye Study (NIES)
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyrightSelf-archiving of the author-manuscript version is not yet supported by this journal. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version or contact the author[s] for more information.
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorGriffiths, Lyn


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