Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBinks, H
dc.contributor.authorVincent, GE
dc.contributor.authorIrwin, C
dc.contributor.authorHeidke, P
dc.contributor.authorVandelanotte, C
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, SL
dc.contributor.authorKhalesi, S
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-06T22:45:19Z
dc.date.available2020-09-06T22:45:19Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn1322-7696
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.colegn.2020.02.013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/397088
dc.description.abstractBackground: Nursing students are at risk of inadequate sleep and poor lifestyle behaviours due to academic, clinical and personal stressors faced throughout their training. However, the relationship between lifestyle and sleep in this population is not well understood. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine whether inadequate sleep was associated with poor diet, physical inactivity, alcohol consumption and smoking in Australian nursing students. Methods: Using a cross-sectional design, nursing students (n = 470) completed an online questionnaire that assessed sleep and lifestyle behaviours. One-way ANOVA, t-tests, Pearson's bivariate correlation and multiple regression testing were used to determine relationships between variables. Findings: Most nursing students experienced inadequate sleep (78%). Patterns of irregular eating, increased intake of discretionary foods, high-risk alcohol consumption and smoking were associated with indicators of inadequate sleep (p < 0.05). Frequent lunch intake (4–7 times per week) was associated with lower global sleep quality scores than irregular lunch intake (β: −1.060, 95% confidence interval −2.022, −0.099), whereas alcohol score was associated with higher global sleep quality scores (β: 0.088, 95% confidence interval 0.011, 0.165) indicating poorer quality sleep, even after adjusting for confounding variables. No significant associations were found between sleep parameters and level of physical activity. Conclusion: This study highlights that nursing students experience inadequate sleep, and that poor lifestyle behaviours were associated with inadequate sleep in this sample. Strategies are needed to address inadequate sleep and poor lifestyle behaviours in nursing students, to support health, academic and clinic performance, as well as the transition to professional nursing practice.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.ispartofjournalCollegian
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic health nutrition
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNutrition and dietetics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4205
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode321005
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3210
dc.titleAssociations between sleep and lifestyle behaviours among Australian nursing students: A cross-sectional study
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationBinks, H; Vincent, GE; Irwin, C; Heidke, P; Vandelanotte, C; Williams, SL; Khalesi, S, Associations between sleep and lifestyle behaviours among Australian nursing students: A cross-sectional study, Collegian, 2020
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.date.updated2020-09-04T04:08:52Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.rights.copyright© YEAR Australian College of Nursing Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence, which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorIrwin, Chris G.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record